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Mastering the End Game: Vol 1

Posted By: tot167
Mastering the End Game: Vol 1

M. Shereshevsky, L.M. Slutsky, “Mastering the End Game: Vol 1”
Everyman Chess | 1997 | ISBN: 1857441699 | 1997 pages | PDF | 6,1 MB

Astonishing!

This astonishingly beautiful chess work is the pinnacle of what chess literature should be, on every level: it is a physically large book (9-3/4" x 6-3/4") with 248 pages; the pages are laid out two-columns with plenty of diagrams; the annotations are poignant and thematically focused; complete games are given, so that one may see the connection of the opening to the endgame. Volume one investigates open and semi-open games. The book is arranged by opening, beginning with the Sicilian Defence. Shereshevsky is a natural teacher, as anyone familiar with his classic work Endgame Strategy knows. This is not an endgame book per se; rather, it brings you complete games, with the endgame always in mind. For instance, it is generally true that in the Sicilian Defence the short wins go to white, and the long wins to black. The authors use Sicilian game examples to show you why this is the case, and, in more modern games, why this often is not the case. So, there is an explicit plan to this book, and each and every game and annotation supports the plan. This is precisely the type of instruction that the intermediate player needs, in order to expand his overall understanding of chess and the endgame from a strategic perspective. This is not to say that tactics are ignored. Indeed, the games presented are tactically beautiful, the idea being that certain strategic plusses lead to tactical possibilities. The games selected by the authors are wonderful to play through, so this book constantly entertains and astonishes, even as it educates you. Compared to more recent works, I would compare this book (and volume two on the closed games) to the two works on pawn play by Drazen Marovic. I consider all four of these books to be indispensable parts of my chess collection.







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