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Sparta's Bitter Victories: Politics and Diplomacy in the Corinthian War

Posted By: Jeembo
Sparta's Bitter Victories: Politics and Diplomacy in the Corinthian War

Sparta's Bitter Victories: Politics and Diplomacy in the Corinthian War by Charles D. Hamilton
English | 1979 | ISBN: 0801411580 | 352 Pages | PDF | 40.0 MB

In 405 B.C. a Spartan admiral dealt a deathblow to the imperial ambitions of Athens at the battle of Aegospotami. But with the end of Athen’s ambitons, the poleis of ancient Greece were left with a power vacuum, which Sparta attempted to fill. To most cities the aims of Sparta, imperial or domestic, were no more welcome than those of Athens. And when Persian and Ionian Greek worlds also met the Aegean Greek world, the result became a time of turmoil leading to war – the Corinthian War.

This is an utterly enthralling read, but one which I would not recommend to anyone who does not already have a fairly solid knowledge and understanding of ancient Greece and Persia, and the Peloponnesian War, to attempt without careful study. It is of necessity dense in information and layers of context, and it is the author’s attempt to place the aftermath of the Peloponesian War, and the ensuing Corinthian War in its correct political, social, economic, military and diplomatic contexts of the wider Greek world that makes it so interesting.

Thoroughly recommended to students of Ancient Greece, this is a most worthwhile read, and a richly rewarding study of the times and places of the Corinthian War and offers as a result a clearer understanding of both why efforts to find peace after the end of the Peloponnesian War failed, and why Greece was to fall to the ambitions of Macedonia under Philip II and Alexander III (the Great).