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Le Corbeiller, Clare, "Eighteenth-Century Italian Porcelain"

Posted By: TimMa
Le Corbeiller, Clare, "Eighteenth-Century Italian Porcelain"

Le Corbeiller, Clare, "Eighteenth-Century Italian Porcelain"
Publisher: Metropolitan Museum of Art | 1985 | ISBN: 0870994212 | English | PDF | 32 pages | 2.71 Mb

The earliest European porcelain was made in Florence under the patronage of Francesco I de’ Medici, grand duke of Tuscany. It was inspired by the blue and white hard-paste porcelains being imported from China, but, unlike them, was composed of different elements. Kaolin, the clay that is essential to hard paste, was not discovered in Europe until the eighteenth century. Substitute formulas, using white clays mixed with varying combinations of lime and other ingredients, such as steatite or alabaster, produced so-called soft-paste bodies. As the first of these, Medici porcelain was of exceptional importance both as an accomplishment and for the amalgamation of oriental, Near Eastern, and High Renaissance styles in its forms and decoration. It was also a unique, isolated phenomenon: the enterprise came to an end with Francesco’s death in 1587, and, although there is evidence of scattered production up to the 1630s, systematic porcelain manufacture in Italy only began in the following century.

The eighteenth'Century Italian factories were highly regional in character. Whereas Meissen generated a dozen factories in Germany that took their cue from its repertoire, and Sevres in France succeeded in imposing broad stylistic authority, the Italian factories had little influence on each other.
Gricci, Giuseppe | Permoser, Balthasar (German, 1651–1732) | Stella, Jacques


Le Corbeiller, Clare, "Eighteenth-Century Italian Porcelain"