Emerson, Lake & Palmer – Brain Salad Surgery (1973) Manticore/MC 66669 – Original US Pressing - LP/FLAC In 24bit/96kHz

Posted By: Fran Solo
Emerson, Lake & Palmer – Brain Salad Surgery (1973) Manticore/MC 66669 – Original US Pressing - LP/FLAC In 24bit/96kHz

Emerson, Lake & Palmer – Brain Salad Surgery
Vinyl | LP Cover (1:1) | FLAC + cue | 24bit/96kHz & 16bit/44kHz | 900mb & 200mb
Label: Manticore/MC 66669 | Released: 1973 | Genre: Symphonic-Rock

A1 Jerusalem
A2 Toccata
A3 Still….You Turn Me On
A4 Benny The Bouncer
A5 Karn Evil 9 (1st Impression – Part 1)

B1 Karn Evil 9 (1st Impression – Part 2)
B2 Karn Evil 9 (2nd Impression)
B3 Karn Evil 9 (3rd Impression)


Distributed By – Atlantic Recording Corporation
Distributed By – WEA Records Ltd.
Phonographic Copyright (p) – Manticore Records Ltd.
Copyright © – Manticore Music Ltd.
Published By – Manticore Music Ltd.
Published By – Boosey & Hawkes
Pressed By – Specialty Records Corporation
Produced At – Advision Studios
Mastered At – Atlantic Studios
Credits
Design, Art Direction – Fabio Nicoli Associates
Engineer – Chris Kimsey, Geoff Young
Organ, Piano, Harpsichord, Accordion, Synthesizer [Custom Built Moog Synthesizers], Synthesizer [Moog Polyphonic Enssemble] – Keith Emerson
Painting – H.R. Giger*
Percussion, Synthesizer [Percussion] – Carl Palmer
Photography By [Photographs of Keith, Greg and Carl] – Rosemary Adams
Producer – Greg Lake
Vocals, Bass, Electric Guitar [Zemaitis Electric 6 & 12 Sting Guitars] – Greg Lake
Notes
℗ & © 1973

A2 – An adaptation of Ginastera’s 1st Piano Concerto, 4th Movement.

This is the actual first UK release of the album, and it was pressed in the USA by Atlantic Records at Speciality Records Corporation (SRC logo on runout: large S with R and C in the loops).

This 1st pressing was released on November 19, 1973 in both the US and the UK at the same time. US copies had -F stampers on both sides, UK copies had G- stampers on both sides.

The US disc and the Atlantic “Rock 4” inner sleeve were imported back into the UK and housed in the UK first edition sleeve with the catalogue number K53501 on rear and spine and Manticore logo distributed by WEA Records Ltd on rear.

Later issues were printed with a Manticore/WEA catalogue number. Original pressing comes in a fold out jacket and a poster.

Below the Manticore logo, there is a misspelled “Manicore” on rear. That was corrected already on the first, non-hybrid, 100% made in the UK Brain Salad Surgery release, which had vinyl made in the UK and presented also the fold out jacket and the poster.
Die-cut, fly-out cover reveals a unipak-style sleeve which holds disc and insert.

Multi-fold insert contains lyrics, credits, photos and interactive artwork.

Published by Manticore Music Ltd., BMI except “Toccata” – Boosey & Hawkes, ASCAP

Original cover painting by H. R. Giger by arrangement with the House Of Ideas, Zurich.
Barcode and Other Identifiers
Matrix / Runout (Side A Label): ST-MC-732991
Matrix / Runout (Side B Label): ST-MC-732992
Matrix / Runout (Side A runout etched): ST-MC-732991-G (Large S with R and C in the loops) AT PR
Matrix / Runout (Side B runout etched): ST-MC-732992-G (Large S with R and C in the loops) AT PR
Matrix / Runout (Side A runout etched, variant 1): ST-MC-732991-F (Large S with R and C in the loops) AT 1-4
Matrix / Runout (Side B runout etched, variant 1): ST-MC-732992-F(Large S with R and C in the loops) AT 1-4


Emerson, Lake & Palmer – Brain Salad Surgery (1973) Manticore/MC 66669 – Original US Pressing - LP/FLAC In 24bit/96kHz

Emerson, Lake & Palmer – Brain Salad Surgery (1973) Manticore/MC 66669 – Original US Pressing - LP/FLAC In 24bit/96kHz

Emerson, Lake & Palmer – Brain Salad Surgery (1973) Manticore/MC 66669 – Original US Pressing - LP/FLAC In 24bit/96kHz



Cleaning: RCM Moth MkII Pro Vinyl
Direct Drive Turntable: Technics SL-1200MK2 Quartz
Cartridge: SHURE M97xE With JICO SAS Stylus
Amplifier: Marantz 2252
ADC: E-MU 0404
DeClick with iZotope RX5: Only Manual (Click per click)
Vinyl Condition: EX
This LP: From my personal collection
LP Rip & Full Scan LP Cover: Fran Solo
Password: WITHOUT PASSWORD

One thing is quite certain: ou can love this album to death or loathe it with every fiber of your being, but you can’t really ignore it. From the gorgeusly disturbing gatefold sleeve, displaying a masterpiece of Gothic artwork by Swiss cult artist R.H. Giger (of “Alien” fame), down to the unabashed self-indulgence of its musical content, “Brain Salad Surgery” is a compendium of everything progressive rock is all about, the good, the bad and the ugly. It is loud, metallic, and harsh, undeniably bombastic, though it can also be melodic and soothing – a true rollercoaster ride of an album, swinging from the beautiful, English choirboy vocals of “Jerusalem” (with wonderful lyrics courtesy of one Mr William Blake) to the all-out progressive orgy that is “Karn Evil 9”.
BSS is not an easy listen, despite the presence of the obligatory Greg Lake ballad, the much-maligned (especially in a lyrical sense) but moving and vocally stunning “Still…You Turn Me On”, which offers some much-needed respite from the relentless bludgeoning of Keith Emerson’s keyboards and Carl Palmer’s percussion in the preceeding “Toccata”. The piano-driven “Benny the Bouncer”, instead, is undeniably the only weak link in the record, good for a few laughs but nothing more. However, silly and pointless as it may sound, it prepares the listener for the album’s pièce de resistance, the 30-minute-plus “Karn Evil 9”, one of prog rock’s defining moments (for better and for worse). A weird sci-fi tale of man versus technology, it contains more than a stab at political and religious institutions, especially in the famed “1st Impression – Part 2”, better known as “Welcome Back My Friends to the Show that Never Ends”. Emerson and Palmer have a field day on this epic tour de force, creating all sorts of eerie, dissonant sounds, on which Lake stamps his presence by singing in a more assertive, even aggressive way than his usual, elegant delivery. As with all ELP albums (with the possible exception of their debut), this one is not perfect either, containing as it does both priceless gems and disposable filler. So, why 5 stars? Because it’s one of the absolute highpoints of its genre, and no one can say to know prog rock without having ever listened to it at least once. Call it pompous, overblown and outdated, it’s still a hell of a record, one many contemporary bands can only dream of producing. Nowadays, no one would probably have the nerve…
Review by Raff, progarchives.com
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