Chicago - The Hi-Res Album Collection (1969-2014) [24bit/192kHz] Combined RE-UP

Posted By: HDV
Chicago - The Hi-Res Album Collection (1969-2014) [24bit/192kHz] Combined RE-UP

Chicago - The Hi-Res Album Collection (1969-2014)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/192 kHz | Time - 579:52 minutes | ~ 20,2 GB
Studio Master, Official Digital Download | Artwork: Front cover(s)

In 1967, Chicago musicians Walter Parazaider, Terry Kath, Danny Seraphine, Lee Loughnane, James Pankow, Robert Lamm, and Peter Cetera formed a group with one dream, to integrate all the musical diversity from their beloved city and weave a new sound, a rock 'n' roll band with horns. Their dream turned into record sales topping the 100,000,000 mark, including 21 Top 10 singles, 5 consecutive Number One albums, 11 Number One singles and 5 Gold singles. An incredible 25 of their 32 albums have been certified platinum, and the band has a total of 47 gold and platinum awards.



Chicago - The Hi-Res Album Collection (1969-2014) [24bit/192kHz] Combined RE-UP

Chicago - Chicago Transit Authority (1969/2013)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/192 kHz | Time - 77:15 minutes | 2,15 GB
Studio Master, Official Digital Download | Artwork: Front cover

Chicago Transit Authority is the band’s timeless debut. It is a masterful blend of jazz and rock. This must-have classic reached #17 in the U.S. and #9 on the U.K. Pop charts. This seminal album features the Top Ten hits “Beginnings” and “Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?” It is included in the 1001 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die.

Few debut albums can boast as consistently solid an effort as the self-titled Chicago Transit Authority (1969). Even fewer can claim to have enough material to fill out a double-disc affair. Although this long- player was ultimately the septet's first national exposure, the group was far from the proverbial "overnight sensation." Under the guise of the Big Thing, the group soon to be known as CTA had been honing its eclectic blend of jazz, classical, and straight-ahead rock & roll in and around the Windy City for several years. Their initial non-musical meeting occurred during a mid-February 1967 confab between the original combo at Walter Parazaider's apartment on the north side of Chi Town. Over a year later, Columbia Records staff producer James Guercio became a key supporter of the group, which he rechristened Chicago Transit Authority. In fairly short order the band relocated to the West Coast and began woodshedding the material that would comprise this title. In April of 1969, the dozen sides of Chicago Transit Authority unleashed a formidable and ultimately American musical experience. This included an unheralded synthesis of electric guitar wailin' rock & roll to more deeply rooted jazz influences and arrangements. This approach economized the finest of what the band had to offer – actually two highly stylized units that coexisted with remarkable singularity. On the one hand, listeners were presented with an incendiary rock & roll quartet of Terry Kath (lead guitar/vocals), Robert Lamm (keyboards/vocals), Peter Cetera (bass/vocals), and Danny Seraphine (drums). They were augmented by the equally aggressive power brass trio that included Lee Loughnane (trumpet/vocals), James Pankow (trombone), and the aforementioned Parazaider (woodwind/vocals). This fusion of rock with jazz would also yield some memorable pop sides and enthusiasts' favorites as well. Most notably, a quarter of the material on the double album – "Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?," "Beginnings," "Questions 67 and 68," and the only cover on the project, Steve Winwood's "I'm a Man" – also scored as respective entries on the singles chart. The tight, infectious, and decidedly pop arrangements contrast with the piledriving blues-based rock of "Introduction" and "South California Purples" as well as the 15-plus minute extemporaneous free for all "Liberation." Even farther left of center are the experimental avant-garde "Free Form Guitar" and the politically intoned and emotive "Prologue, August 29, 1968" and "Someday (August 29, 1968).

Tracklist:

01 - Introduction
02 - Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?
03 - Beginnings
04 - Questions 67 And 68
05 - Listen
06 - Poem 58
07 - Free Form Guitar
08 - Southern California Purples
09 - I'm A Man
10 - Prologue, August 29, 1968
11 - Someday (August 29, 1968)
12 - Liberation

Analyzed: Chicago / Chicago Transit Authority
––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

DR Peak RMS Duration Track
––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
DR12 -0.24 dB -14.29 dB 6:36 01-Introduction
DR12 -0.91 dB -16.02 dB 4:36 02-Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?
DR12 -0.66 dB -15.91 dB 7:55 03-Beginnings
DR13 -0.78 dB -16.30 dB 5:10 04-Questions 67 And 68
DR12 -1.19 dB -15.38 dB 3:25 05-Listen
DR12 -0.57 dB -15.66 dB 8:40 06-Poem 58
DR10 -3.07 dB -16.16 dB 6:56 07-Free Form Guitar
DR11 0.00 dB -13.67 dB 6:14 08-Southern California Purples
DR12 -0.20 dB -15.89 dB 7:43 09-I'm A Man
DR10 -9.63 dB -21.73 dB 0:58 10-Prologue, August 29, 1968
DR10 -3.53 dB -16.96 dB 4:19 11-Someday (August 29, 1968)
DR11 -4.12 dB -17.55 dB 14:43 12-Liberation
––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Number of tracks: 12
Official DR value: DR11

Samplerate: 192000 Hz
Channels: 2
Bits per sample: 24
Bitrate: 4844 kbps
Codec: FLAC
================================================================================



Chicago - The Hi-Res Album Collection (1969-2014) [24bit/192kHz] Combined RE-UP

Chicago - Chicago II (1970/2003)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/96 kHz | Time - 67:15 minutes | 1,46 GB
Studio Master, Official Digital Download | Artwork: Front cover

Chicago's 1970 platinum-seller marked the breakthrough of what would become one of the most commercially successful bands of the 1970s. The album yielded 3 top ten singles: "25 or 6 to 4," "Make Me Smile," and "Colour My World".

The Chicago Transit Authority recorded this double-barreled follow-up to their eponymously titled 1969 debut effort. The contents of Chicago II (1970) underscore the solid foundation of complex jazz changes with heavy electric rock & roll that the band so brazenly forged on the first set. The septet also continued its ability to blend the seemingly divergent musical styles into some of the best and most effective pop music of the era. One thing that had changed was the band's name, which was shortened to simply Chicago to avoid any potential litigious situations from the city of Chicago's transportation department – which claimed the name as proprietary property. Musically, James Pankow (trombone) was about to further cross-pollinate the band's sound with the multifaceted six-song "Ballet for a Girl in Buchannon." The classically inspired suite also garnered the band two of its most beloved hits – the upbeat pop opener "Make Me Smile" as well as the achingly poignant "Color My World" – both of which remained at the center of the group's live sets. Chicago had certainly not abandoned its active pursuit of blending high-octane electric rockers such as "25 or 6 to 4" to the progressive jazz inflections heard in the breezy syncopation of "The Road." Adding further depth of field is the darker "Poem for the People" as well as the politically charged five-song set titled "It Better End Soon." These selections feature the band driving home its formidable musicality and uncanny ability to coalesce styles telepathically and at a moment's notice. The contributions of Terry Kath (guitar/vocals) stand out as he unleashes some of his most pungent and sinuous leads, which contrast with the tight brass and woodwind trio of Lee Loughnane (trumpet/vocals), Walter Parazaider (woodwinds/vocals), and the aforementioned Pankow. Peter Cetera (bass/vocals) also marks his songwriting debut – on the final cut of both the suite and the album – with "Where Do We Go from Here." It bookends both with at the very least the anticipation and projection of a positive and optimistic future. Potential consumers should note the unsurpassed sound quality and deluxe packaging of the 2002 CD remaster.

Tracklist:

01 - Movin' In
02 - The Road
03 - Poem for the People
04 - In the Country
05 - Wake Up Sunshine
06 - Ballet for a Girl in Buchannon: Make Me Smile
07 - Ballet for a Girl in Buchannon: So Much to Say, So Much to Give
08 - Ballet for a Girl in Buchannon: Anxiety's Moment
09 - Ballet for a Girl in Buchannon: West Virginia Fantasies
10 - Ballet for a Girl in Buchannon: Colour My World
11 - Ballet for a Girl in Buchannon: To Be Free
12 - Ballet for a Girl in Buchannon: Now More Than Ever
13 - Ballet for a Girl in Buchannon: Fancy Colours
14 - Ballet for a Girl in Buchannon: 25 or 6 to 4
15 - Prelude
16 - Ballet for a Girl in Buchannon: A.M. Mourning
17 - Ballet for a Girl in Buchannon: P.M. Mourning
18 - Ballet for a Girl in Buchannon: Memories of Love
19 - It Better End Soon: 1st Movement
20 - It Better End Soon: 2nd Movement
21 - It Better End Soon: 3rd Movement
22 - It Better End Soon: 4th Movement
23 - It Better End Soon: Where Do We Go from Here

Analyzed: Chicago / Chicago II
––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

DR Peak RMS Duration Track
––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
DR11 -0.41 dB -13.05 dB 4:07 01-Movin' In
DR9 -0.97 dB -12.36 dB 3:12 02-The Road
DR10 -1.50 dB -14.41 dB 5:34 03-Poem for the People
DR10 -0.62 dB -12.88 dB 6:35 04-In the Country
DR12 -0.34 dB -14.26 dB 2:32 05-Wake Up Sunshine
DR11 0.00 dB -12.56 dB 3:16 06-Ballet for a Girl in Buchannon: Make Me Smile
DR11 -0.76 dB -13.75 dB 1:11 07-Ballet for a Girl in Buchannon: So Much to Say, So Much to Give
DR12 -0.81 dB -16.09 dB 1:01 08-Ballet for a Girl in Buchannon: Anxiety's Moment
DR12 -0.52 dB -13.98 dB 1:33 09-Ballet for a Girl in Buchannon: West Virginia Fantasies
DR11 -1.57 dB -14.98 dB 3:00 10-Ballet for a Girl in Buchannon: Colour My World
DR11 -0.01 dB -12.57 dB 1:15 11-Ballet for a Girl in Buchannon: To Be Free
DR10 0.00 dB -11.90 dB 1:25 12-Ballet for a Girl in Buchannon: Now More Than Ever
DR12 -0.67 dB -15.02 dB 5:09 13-Ballet for a Girl in Buchannon: Fancy Colours
DR11 -0.33 dB -12.75 dB 4:57 14-Ballet for a Girl in Buchannon: 25 or 6 to 4
DR9 -7.75 dB -20.44 dB 1:10 15-Prelude
DR11 -2.37 dB -18.75 dB 2:05 16-Ballet for a Girl in Buchannon: A.M. Mourning
DR12 -3.15 dB -18.01 dB 1:58 17-Ballet for a Girl in Buchannon: P.M. Mourning
DR13 -3.73 dB -21.84 dB 3:59 18-Ballet for a Girl in Buchannon: Memories of Love
DR12 -2.28 dB -16.41 dB 2:34 19-It Better End Soon: 1st Movement
DR12 -1.58 dB -16.79 dB 3:40 20-It Better End Soon: 2nd Movement
DR11 -2.08 dB -16.07 dB 3:19 21-It Better End Soon: 3rd Movement
DR10 -2.34 dB -14.61 dB 0:53 22-It Better End Soon: 4th Movement
DR10 -1.57 dB -13.69 dB 2:49 23-It Better End Soon: Where Do We Go from Here
––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Number of tracks: 23
Official DR value: DR11

Samplerate: 96000 Hz
Channels: 2
Bits per sample: 24
Bitrate: 2975 kbps
Codec: FLAC
================================================================================



Chicago - The Hi-Res Album Collection (1969-2014) [24bit/192kHz] Combined RE-UP

Chicago - Chicago V (1972/2011)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/192 kHz | Time - 45:05 minutes | 1,66 GB
Studio Master, Official Digital Download | Artwork: Front cover

Chicago’s fourth studio album (and fifth release) was the band’s first #1 album and featured the hits "Saturday In The Park" and "Dialogue (Part I & II)." The biggest hit album of 1972, Chicago V was eventually certified 2X Platinum and remains one of the band’s most critically acclaimed works.

With four gold multi-disc LPs and twice as many hit singles to its credit, Chicago issued its fifth effort, the first to clock in at under an hour. What they lack in quantity, they more than make up for in the wide range of quality of material. The disc erupts with the progressive free-form "A Hit by Varese" – which seems to have been inspired as much by Emerson, Lake & Palmer's Tarkus (1971) or Yes circa Close to the Edge (1972) as by the Parisian composer for whom it is named. Fully 80 percent of the material on Chicago V (1972) is also a spotlight for the prolific songwriting of Robert Lamm (keyboards/vocals). In addition to penning the opening rocker, he is also responsible for the easy and airy "All Is Well," which is particularly notable for its lush Beach Boys-esque harmonies. However, Lamm's most memorable contributions are undoubtedly the Top Ten sunshine power pop anthem "Saturday in the Park" and the equally upbeat and buoyant "Dialogue, Pt. 1" and "Dialogue, Pt. 2." Those more accessible tracks are contrasted by James Pankow's (trombone/percussion) aggressive jazz fusion "Now That You've Gone." Although somewhat dark and brooding, it recalls the bittersweet "So Much to Say, So Much to Give" and "Anxiety's Moment" movements of "Ballet for a Girl in Buchannon" found on Chicago II.

Tracklist:

01 - A Hit By Varese
02 - All Is Well
03 - Now That You've Gone
04 - Dialogue (Part One)
05 - Dialogue (Part Two)
06 - While The City Sleeps
07 - Saturday In The Park
08 - State Of The Union
09 - Goodbye
10 - Alma Mater

Analyzed: Chicago / Chicago V
––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

DR Peak RMS Duration Track
––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
DR7 -0.10 dB -8.16 dB 4:56 01-A Hit By Varese
DR6 -0.10 dB -8.33 dB 3:52 02-All Is Well
DR7 -0.10 dB -8.11 dB 5:02 03-Now That You've Gone
DR8 -0.10 dB -9.69 dB 2:57 04-Dialogue (Part One)
DR7 -0.10 dB -8.66 dB 4:16 05-Dialogue (Part Two)
DR6 -0.10 dB -8.30 dB 3:58 06-While The City Sleeps
DR7 -0.10 dB -9.25 dB 3:57 07-Saturday In The Park
DR7 -0.10 dB -9.25 dB 6:14 08-State Of The Union
DR7 -0.10 dB -9.13 dB 5:59 09-Goodbye
DR10 -0.13 dB -12.59 dB 3:53 10-Alma Mater
––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Number of tracks: 10
Official DR value: DR7

Samplerate: 192000 Hz
Channels: 2
Bits per sample: 24
Bitrate: 4574 kbps
Codec: FLAC
================================================================================



Chicago - The Hi-Res Album Collection (1969-2014) [24bit/192kHz] Combined RE-UP

Chicago - VIII (1975/2013)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/192 kHz | Time - 39:43 minutes | 1,52 GB
Studio Master, Official Digital Download | Artwork: Front cover

Chicago VIII is the band’s chart-topping 1975 classic. This brilliant, experimental work combines elements of jazz and pop. It features the compelling hit singles, “Old Days,” “Harry Truman” and “Brand New Love Affair - Part I & II.” “Old Days” and “Harry Truman” both reached the Top Twenty on the Billboard Hot 100. This is yet another stunning album in an impressive catalog.

Road-weary and running low on steam, the members of Chicago began tinkering with their formula on the nostalgic Chicago VIII. Robert Lamm continued to loosen his grip on the songwriting, allowing Peter Cetera, Terry Kath, and James Pankow to pen the majority of the album. The enthusiasm and drive that the band had displayed on their previous efforts was audibly escaping them, best exemplified by the lazy drawl that Cetera affects on his otherwise rocking "Anyway You Want." Finally, the jazz tinges continued to appear less and less, replaced by a brassy R&B approach that provides a more rigid structure for their tunes. But these factors don't necessarily count against the band, as many songs have a lazy, late-afternoon feel that provides a few feel-good moments. Pankow's "Brand New Love Affair – Part I & II" is a smooth, light rock ballad that Terry Kath wraps his soulful voice around, transforming it into a brooding lament on lost love. This track also begins to incorporate the multi-vocalist approach that would become the trademark of their '80s work, as the second half of the song is sung by Cetera and Lamm as well. Kath's "Oh, Thank You Great Spirit" is another winner, as his delicate vocals drift along on a sparse and psychedelic (for Chicago at least) sea of guitars. Pankow's "Old Days" may be the only other notable track, a powerful rocker that showcases his tight compositional skills and provided the band with the only memorable hit song from the record. Lamm's contributions are the least-commercial songs, as his arty and dynamic tracks are nostalgic entries that show him moving in an atypical direction lyrically and musically. Only his "Harry Truman" really connects, and the instrumental tributes to Depression-era jazz and the goofy singalong ending manage to render the song silly before it can really sink in. Although not terrible by any means, Chicago VIII is heavily burdened by their obvious desire to take a break. The band hits upon some wonderful ideas here, but they are simply too weary to follow them up, and the resulting album has none of the tight orchestration that reigns in their more ridiculous tendencies.

Tracklist:

01 - Anyway You Want
02 - Brand New Love Affair - Part I & Ii
03 - Never Been In Love Before
04 - Hideaway
05 - Till We Meet Again
06 - Harry Truman
07 - Oh, Thank You Great Spirit
08 - Long Time No See
09 - Ain't It Blue?
10 - Old Days

Analyzed: Chicago / Chicago Viii
––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

DR Peak RMS Duration Track
––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
DR13 -1.05 dB -16.68 dB 3:40 01-Anyway You Want
DR13 -1.83 dB -17.49 dB 4:30 02-Brand New Love Affair - Part I & Ii
DR14 -0.92 dB -17.76 dB 4:13 03-Never Been In Love Before
DR13 -1.13 dB -16.80 dB 4:49 04-Hideaway
DR12 -2.43 dB -17.67 dB 2:05 05-Till We Meet Again
DR12 -1.54 dB -16.84 dB 3:07 06-Harry Truman
DR12 -2.16 dB -17.19 dB 7:26 07-Oh, Thank You Great Spirit
DR12 -1.16 dB -15.52 dB 2:49 08-Long Time No See
DR13 -0.03 dB -15.88 dB 3:33 09-Ain't It Blue?
DR11 -3.57 dB -17.54 dB 3:30 10-Old Days
––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Number of tracks: 10
Official DR value: DR13

Samplerate: 192000 Hz
Channels: 2
Bits per sample: 24
Bitrate: 5145 kbps
Codec: FLAC
================================================================================



Chicago - The Hi-Res Album Collection (1969-2014) [24bit/192kHz] Combined RE-UP

Chicago - Chicago X (1976/2013)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/192 kHz | Time - 38:04 minutes | 1,46 GB
Studio Master, Official Digital Download | Artwork: Front cover

X is Chicago’s highly acclaimed 1976 gem. This pivotal outing was a worldwide hit, giving Chicago their first U.K. chart album in several years and reached #3 on the Billboard 200. The album features the hits “You Are On My Mind,” “Another Rainy Day In New York City” and “If You Leave Me Now.” “If You Leave Me Now” would win two GRAMMY Awards and X was nominated for Album of the Year, losing to Stevie Wonder’s Songs In The Key Of Life. This quintessential album is a must-have.

Although it was their tenth release Chicago X (1976) was actually the band's eighth studio effort – as Chicago IV (1972) had been a live set from Carnegie Hall and Chicago IX (1975), which precedes this disc, was their first best-of collection. Musically, the combo had effectively abandoned their extended free-form jazz leanings for more succinct pop songs. That is not to say that the band couldn't rock, because they could as evidenced by the Terry Kath (guitar/vocals) full-tilt rave-up "Once or Twice," which commences the album. The hot brass section bows deeply and respectfully to their Muscle Shoals counterparts as Kath does his best funky Otis Redding vocal. Showing his tremendous depth of field, Kath bookends the LP with the empowering and positive "Hope for Love." In between those two extremes are some of Chicago's best-known works – such as Peter Cetera's (bass/vocals) chart-topping light rock epic "If You Leave Me Now" and Robert Lamm's (keyboards/vocals) "Another Rainy Night in New York City." The latter side also reveals a minor motif, as it is a Latin-based song about the Big Apple. It follows in the footsteps of the improv-heavy "Italian from New York" from their previous studio effort, the fusion-filled Chicago VII (1974). Lamm contributes a few other tucked-away classics to Chicago X as well – such as the aggressive and sexy "You Get It Up." There are also a pair from James Pankow(trombone/vocals) in the form of the syncopated "You Are on My Mind" – which crossed over onto both the adult contemporary as well as pop music charts. His other composition is the classy brass of "Skin Tight." The upfront horn interjections and overall augmentation are akin to the sound made famous by their West Coast Tower of Power contemporaries. As a majority of their previous efforts had done – all sans their debut – Chicago X was a Top Ten album and "If You Leave Me Now" became a double Grammy winner, for both Best Pop Vocal Performance by a Duo Group or Chorus and Best Arrangement Accompanying Vocalist(s). The latter award was actually not given to the band, but rather to noted string arranger Jimmie Haskell and the group's longtime producer, James William Guercio. Another well-deserved Grammy was given to John Berg for his visually enticing cover art – depicting Chicago's logo on the wrapper of what otherwise appears to be a Hershey chocolate bar. As the disc was released in the summer of the U.S. bicentennial (1976), the all-American image was undoubtedly and duly noted.

Tracklist:

01 - Once Or Twice
02 - You Are On My Mind
03 - Skin Tight
04 - If You Leave Me Now
05 - Together Again
06 - Another Rainy Day In New York City
07 - Mama Mama
08 - Scrapbook
09 - Gently I'll Wake You
10 - You Get It Up
11 - Hope For Love

Analyzed: Chicago / X
––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

DR Peak RMS Duration Track
––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
DR11 -1.78 dB -14.77 dB 3:00 01-Once Or Twice
DR14 -0.40 dB -17.51 dB 3:23 02-You Are On My Mind
DR14 -0.81 dB -16.94 dB 3:21 03-Skin Tight
DR13 -2.77 dB -18.21 dB 3:58 04-If You Leave Me Now
DR13 -1.48 dB -17.20 dB 3:54 05-Together Again
DR13 -1.35 dB -16.80 dB 3:01 06-Another Rainy Day In New York City
DR12 -0.38 dB -15.64 dB 3:34 07-Mama Mama
DR13 -1.07 dB -16.26 dB 3:32 08-Scrapbook
DR14 -0.60 dB -17.02 dB 3:37 09-Gently I'll Wake You
DR14 -0.05 dB -16.55 dB 3:40 10-You Get It Up
DR12 -3.00 dB -18.87 dB 3:03 11-Hope For Love
––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Number of tracks: 11
Official DR value: DR13

Samplerate: 192000 Hz
Channels: 2
Bits per sample: 24
Bitrate: 5010 kbps
Codec: FLAC
================================================================================



Chicago - The Hi-Res Album Collection (1969-2014) [24bit/192kHz] Combined RE-UP

Chicago - Chicago XI (1977/2013)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/192 kHz | Time - 44:47 minutes | 1,78 GB
Studio Master, Official Digital Download | Artwork: Front cover

Chicago XI (1977) was the final studio effort to feature the original septet, who by this time had been performing and recording for nearly a decade. In late January 1978, founding member Terry Kath (guitar/vocals) accidentally and fatally shot himself, forever altering the band's sound and indeed much of the combo's tenacious rock & roll heart. It is somewhat fitting that their ninth studio release (11th overall) contains two Kath compositions as well as a pair of additional lead vocals. The funky, up-tempo "Mississippi Delta Blues" opens the album with a showcase of his writing and performance skills. The more aggressive "Takin' It On Uptown" is a gritty rocker that further demonstrates Kath's unparalleled fret board prowess. These tougher tracks are counterbalanced by another round of light pop balladry from the usual suspects of Peter Cetera (bass/vocals), whose "Baby, What a Big Surprise" was the perfect Top Ten follow-up to his chart-topping and two-time Grammy-winning "If You Leave Me Now" from Chicago X (1976). Although undeniably successful, the group had become somewhat predictable as well. This, along with the increasingly schizophrenic popular music trend toward both disco and punk, simultaneously stifled the album's other lightweight fare, such as Daniel Seraphine's "Take Me Back to Chicago" or his slightly darker and more heavily orchestrated "Little One," featuring a truly emotive lead vocal from Kath. Speaking of orchestration, Chicago XI also includes a full-blown mini symphony courtesy of noted West Coast arranger Dominic Frontiere, whose résumé includes contributions to artists as far afield as Booker T. & the M.G.'s and Dan Fogelberg to Eartha Kitt or Bing Crosby. On this album, he not only adds well-placed strings to the hit "Baby, What a Big Surprise," but also the more inclusive instrumental "The Inner Struggles of a Man" and the "Prelude" to "Little One." Also worth mentioning are James Pankow's soulful pop ballad "Till the End of Time," which is pulled off with a sonic finesse reminiscent of "Big" Al Anderson during his NRBQ days. Adding to the hauntingly familiar refrain are some sweet vocal inflections and a brassy horn section, who supply a laid-back and understated bed not unlike that of the Q's Whole Wheat Horns. Another blow was dealt to the band's internal structure by way of their somewhat acrimonious split with producer and (at least in the beginning) musical mentor James William Guercio – under whose direction Chicago had been "discovered." Long-existing struggles between the band and management included the predicable and arguable overuse of the distinct Cola-Cola-inspired "Chicago" logo and Roman numeral cataloging – both of which had prominently graced the cover of every single band release thus far. Additional and much less visible conflicts also existed between bandmembers and their producer as well. Fortunately, the spirit of Chicago would re-emerge under the direction of famed soundsmith Phil Ramone for their next effort, Hot Streets (1978).

Tracklist:

01 - Mississippi Delta City Blues
02 - Baby, What A Big Surprise
03 - Till The End Of Time
04 - Policeman
05 - Take Me Back To Chicago
06 - Vote For Me
07 - Takin' It On Uptown
08 - This Time
09 - The Inner Struggles Of A Man
10 - Prelude (Little One)
11 - Little One

Analyzed: Chicago / Chicago XI
––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

DR Peak RMS Duration Track
––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
DR13 -0.10 dB -15.27 dB 4:43 01-Mississippi Delta City Blues
DR12 -1.42 dB -16.78 dB 3:07 02-Baby, What A Big Surprise
DR12 -1.43 dB -16.67 dB 4:52 03-Till The End Of Time
DR14 -0.94 dB -17.42 dB 4:04 04-Policeman
DR13 -2.40 dB -18.87 dB 5:22 05-Take Me Back To Chicago
DR13 -0.53 dB -16.74 dB 3:46 06-Vote For Me
DR14 -1.42 dB -17.02 dB 4:47 07-Takin' It On Uptown
DR14 -0.09 dB -16.93 dB 4:50 08-This Time
DR11 -2.42 dB -19.97 dB 2:44 09-The Inner Struggles Of A Man
DR10 -2.75 dB -20.44 dB 0:52 10-Prelude (Little One)
DR12 -0.91 dB -16.24 dB 5:42 11-Little One
––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Number of tracks: 11
Official DR value: DR13

Samplerate: 192000 Hz
Channels: 2
Bits per sample: 24
Bitrate: 5322 kbps
Codec: FLAC
================================================================================



Chicago - The Hi-Res Album Collection (1969-2014) [24bit/192kHz] Combined RE-UP

Chicago - Chicago X (1976/2013)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/192 kHz | Time - 41:40 minutes | 1,64 GB
Studio Master, Official Digital Download | Artwork: Front cover

Hot Streets is Chicago’s twelfth studio classic. Co-produced by Phil Ramone, the album features the arrival of Donnie Dacus. It reached the Top Twenty on the Billboard 200 and features the hit singles “Alive Again,” “No Tell Lover” and “Gone Long Gone.” Hot Streets finds the band incorporating various elements of jazz into their pop-rock sound.

Although Chicago tragically marked its decade anniversary with the bitter loss of lead guitarist Terry Kath, Hot Streets (1978) was not only the first release without him, it was also the band's initial offering away from James William Guercio – with whom the group had worked on every one of its previous dozen long-players. Donnie Dacus (guitar/vocals) was brought in to fill Kath's formidable shoes. His maiden voyage would likewise mark the beginning of a downward spiral in terms of the string of hits that was usually associated with Chicago albums. Both the upbeat and pumping opener "Alive Again" and the typical adult contemporary balladry of "No Tell Lover" became their last Top 40 hits for nearly four years. Phil Ramone's production gives the material an added and noticeable bite. The Peter Cetera (bass/vocals) rocker "Little Miss Lovin" recalls the band's earliest sides by blending an aggressive backbeat with a funky and soulful rhythm. "Gone, Long, Gone," the disc's other Cetera contribution, also stands out for Dacus' spot-on slide guitar intonation, which mimics a similar style used most notably by George Harrison. Although it failed to chart when extracted as a single, Robert Lamm's (keyboards/vocals) "Love Was New" is one of the more jazz-influenced tunes on Hot Streets. The laid-back groove effortlessly carries the melody behind a fusion of light rock and contemporary jazz. The rapidly changing pop music landscape, whose horizons would embrace disco and new wave, would all but abandon Chicago for the group's next few albums.

Tracklist:

01 - Alive Again
02 - The Greatest Love
03 - Little Miss Lovin'
04 - Hot Streets
05 - Take A Chance
06 - Gone Long Gone
07 - Ain't It Time
08 - Love Was New
09 - No Tell Lover
10 - Show Me The Way

Analyzed: Chicago / Hot Streets
––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

DR Peak RMS Duration Track
––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
DR13 -0.36 dB -15.71 dB 4:09 01-Alive Again
DR13 -1.09 dB -17.03 dB 3:18 02-The Greatest Love
DR12 -0.59 dB -14.86 dB 4:36 03-Little Miss Lovin'
DR13 -1.27 dB -16.33 dB 5:20 04-Hot Streets
DR13 -1.72 dB -17.35 dB 4:45 05-Take A Chance
DR13 -0.63 dB -15.77 dB 3:59 06-Gone Long Gone
DR12 -0.14 dB -14.69 dB 4:13 07-Ain't It Time
DR14 -1.22 dB -17.86 dB 3:30 08-Love Was New
DR13 -1.12 dB -17.20 dB 4:13 09-No Tell Lover
DR14 -0.02 dB -16.97 dB 3:35 10-Show Me The Way
––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Number of tracks: 10
Official DR value: DR13

Samplerate: 192000 Hz
Channels: 2
Bits per sample: 24
Bitrate: 5115 kbps
Codec: FLAC
================================================================================



Chicago - The Hi-Res Album Collection (1969-2014) [24bit/192kHz] Combined RE-UP

Chicago - Chicago 13 (1979/2013)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/192 kHz | Time - 47:07 minutes | 1,77 GB
Studio Master, Official Digital Download | Artwork: Front cover

Chicago 13 is the band’s 1979 Gold-certified classic. Produced by Phil Ramone, the album finds the group charting new territory and incorporating elements of disco into their trademark sound. With each member contributing originals, Chicago 13 features the standouts “Street Player” and “Must Have Been Crazy.” This innovative release is a vital addition to any music lover’s library.

While it might be a stretch to claim that disco in effect killed Chicago, as this effort exemplifies, the dance craze certainly didn't help the band, either. After the moderate success of its previous long-player, Hot Streets (1978), Chicago seemed to have the fortitude to be able to carry on in the wake of the tragic loss of original member Terry Kath (lead guitar/vocals). With the addition of Donnie Dacus (guitar/vocals) and producer Phil Ramone, Chicago scored a pair of strong Top 40 hits with "No Tell Lover" and "Alive Again." By mid-1979, the fickle pop music tides had fully turned toward the beat-intensive drone of disco. Somewhere along the line the rhythm temporarily fixated the band – much in the same way a deer reacts to oncoming headlights. As Chicago 13 (1979) proves, the results in either instance are not pretty. The nine-plus minute "extended" opener, "Street Player," could easily be mistaken for a Village People number. The same fate befalls the overtly funky and urban-influenced "Paradise Alley." Interestingly, the latter was originally slated as the title track from a concurrent Sylvester Stallone snoozer of the same name. The disc does contain a few redeeming moments, however. Laudir DeOliveira (percussion) contributes the breezy and jazz-flavored "Life Is What It Is." Featuring an equally liberating vocal from Peter Cetera (bass/vocals), it includes one of the more tasteful horn arrangements on the album. The ragtime blues feel on Danny Seraphine's (drums) "Aloha Mama" has some well-seasoned brass augmentation, proving that Chicago had not completely abandoned its roots or audience.

Tracklist:

01 - Street Player
02 - Mama Take
03 - Must Have Been Crazy
04 - Window Dreamin'
05 - Paradise Alley
06 - Aloha Mama
07 - Reruns
08 - Loser With A Broken Heart
09 - Life Is What It Is
10 - Run Away

Analyzed: Chicago / Chicago 13
––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

DR Peak RMS Duration Track
––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
DR16 -0.05 dB -18.81 dB 9:13 01-Street Player
DR14 -1.36 dB -18.27 dB 4:15 02-Mama Take
DR14 -0.25 dB -17.24 dB 3:27 03-Must Have Been Crazy
DR13 -2.63 dB -19.19 dB 4:11 04-Window Dreamin'
DR15 -2.08 dB -19.97 dB 3:40 05-Paradise Alley
DR13 -0.10 dB -18.10 dB 4:12 06-Aloha Mama
DR14 -0.44 dB -17.26 dB 4:30 07-Reruns
DR13 -1.88 dB -17.51 dB 4:43 08-Loser With A Broken Heart
DR14 -0.97 dB -18.00 dB 4:37 09-Life Is What It Is
DR13 -0.60 dB -17.37 dB 4:19 10-Run Away
––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Number of tracks: 10
Official DR value: DR14

Samplerate: 192000 Hz
Channels: 2
Bits per sample: 24
Bitrate: 5115 kbps
Codec: FLAC
================================================================================



Chicago - The Hi-Res Album Collection (1969-2014) [24bit/192kHz] Combined RE-UP

Chicago - Chicago 16 (1982/2013)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/192 kHz | Time - 41:46 minutes | 1,6 GB
Official Digital Download - Source: | Front cover

Chicago continued to dominate music with their 1982 Warner Bros. debut. Chicago 16 marked the rebirth of an American band. Produced by David Foster, the album climbed to #9 on the Billboard 200 and introduced the smash Top Ten power ballad “Hard To Say I’m Sorry/Get Away,” now one of the group’s signature songs. Chicago 16 also includes the gem, “Love Me Tomorrow”.

Although they had a moderate hit with 1978's Hot Streets, for all intents and purposes Chicago had been adrift since the tragic death of Terry Kath in January of 1978. Chicago 16 is where the band finally righted itself, in no small part due to the addition of guitarist/keyboardist Bill Champlin, the namesake of the '60s San Franciscan psychedelic outfit the Sons of Champlin, who in addition to joining the band brought into the circle the producer who would change Chicago's commercial fortunes: David Foster. The Canadian producer had worked with Champlin on a solo album, Runaway, which made a very small ripple on the Billboard charts upon its 1981 release, but did pave the way for the sound that Chicago developed on 16. Under the direction of Foster, Chicago turned away from any lingering jazz-rock roots they had, and they also backed away from the disco aspirations that sank their turn-of-the-decade platters. Instead, they pursued a glistening modern pop sound, anchored with dramatic drums, built on synthesizers, decked out in arena rock guitars, layered with harmonies, and stripped of any excesses – which by and large included Chicago's famed horn section, which was now used for punctuation instead of functioning as the center of the group's sound. This was no-nonsense, all-business, crisp and clean pop for the Reagan era, and it not only became a smash hit for Chicago – reaching the Top Ten, thanks to the singles "Hard to Say I'm Sorry" and "Love Me Tomorrow" – it defined Foster's sound, which in turned defined adult contemporary for the '80s. It may not have been too faithful to Chicago, at least what the band was in the '70s, but amidst '80s adult pop, it's a high watermark – and a lot punchier and tougher than the singles would suggest, too, since almost all of the album tracks are relatively high energy and soulful. And since this finds Foster hitting his groove as a producer, 16 is always a pleasure to listen to even when the songs themselves tend toward the forgettable. Again, it's not necessarily an album for fans of Chicago the musicians, but those who love Foster the producer and the two singles on 16, this record is an entertaining period piece.

Tracklist:

01 - What You're Missing
02 - Waiting For You To Decide
03 - Bad Advice
04 - Chains
05 - Hard To Say I'm Sorry/Get Away
06 - Follow Me
07 - Sonny Think Twice
08 - What Can I Say
09 - Rescue You
10 - Love Me Tomorrow

Analyzed: Chicago / Chicago 16
––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

DR Peak RMS Duration Track
––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
DR13 -1.46 dB -16.31 dB 4:11 01-What You're Missing
DR13 -1.75 dB -17.66 dB 4:08 02-Waiting For You To Decide
DR14 -0.03 dB -16.47 dB 2:59 03-Bad Advice
DR13 -2.77 dB -17.69 dB 3:25 04-Chains
DR14 -1.97 dB -19.52 dB 5:12 05-Hard To Say I'm Sorry/Get Away
DR13 -2.70 dB -17.78 dB 4:55 06-Follow Me
DR14 -1.24 dB -18.53 dB 4:02 07-Sonny Think Twice
DR14 -2.45 dB -18.80 dB 3:49 08-What Can I Say
DR14 -1.91 dB -17.29 dB 3:59 09-Rescue You
DR15 -2.22 dB -20.05 dB 5:06 10-Love Me Tomorrow
––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Number of tracks: 10
Official DR value: DR14

Samplerate: 192000 Hz
Channels: 2
Bits per sample: 24
Bitrate: 5118 kbps
Codec: FLAC
================================================================================



Chicago - The Hi-Res Album Collection (1969-2014) [24bit/192kHz] Combined RE-UP

Chicago - Chicago 17 (1984/2013)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/192 kHz | Time - 41:23 minutes | 1,57 GB
Studio Master, Official Digital Download | Artwork: Front cover

Produced by David Foster, Chicago 17 is the band’s 1984 classic. The album marks the final outing with founding bassist/vocalist, Peter Cetera. It reached #4 on the Billboard 200 and features the hit singles, “Along Comes A Woman,” “Hard Habit To Break,” “Stay The Night” and “You’re The Inspiration.” The album would win a GRAMMY for Best Engineered Recording, Non Classical and the track, “Hard Habit To Break” won for Best Instrumental Arrangement Accompanying Vocalist(s)/Best Background Arrangement.

Chicago 16 finally gave Chicago a big hit after a four-year drought, thanks in large part to new producer David Foster, who steered the jazz-rock veterans toward a streamlined, crisply produced pop direction on that 1982 effort. Given that success, it's no surprise that the septet teamed with Foster again for its next album, 1984's Chicago 17 (apparently Roman numerals were left behind along with their progressive jazz-rock). It's also no surprise that Foster took an even greater control of 17, steering the group further down the adult contemporary road and pushing Peter Cetera toward the front of the group, while pushing the horns toward the back. Indeed, it's often possible to not notice the horns on 17; they either fade into the background or meld seamlessly with the synthesizers that are the primary instruments here, providing not just the fabric but foundation of nearly all the arrangements, as synth bass and drum machines replaced the rhythm section. This did not sit well with many longtime fans – and it may have also caused some tension within the group, since Cetera left after this album – but it did make for the biggest hit album in Chicago's history, going quadruple platinum and peaking at number four on the Billboard charts. A big reason for its success is the pair of hit ballads in "Hard Habit to Break" and "You're the Inspiration," two big and slick dramatic ballads that each peaked at number three on the charts and helped set the sound for adult contemporary pop for the rest of the decade; the likes of Michael Bolton and Richard Marx are unimaginable without these songs existing as a blueprint (in fact, Marx sang backup vocals on "We Can Stop the Hurtin'" on 17).

Ballads were a big part of 17 – in fact, these hits and album cuts like "Remember the Feeling" are among the first power ballads, ballads that were given arena rock flourishes and dramatic arrangements but never took the focus off the melody, so housewives and preteens alike could sing along with them. Power ballads later became the province of hair metal bands like Bon Jovi and Poison, but Foster's work with Chicago on 17 really helped set the stage for them, since he not only gave the ballads sweeping rock arrangements, but the harder, punchier tunes here play like ballads. Even when the band turns up the intensity here – "Stay the Night" has a spare, rather ominous beat that suggests they were trying for album-oriented rock; "Along Comes a Woman" has a stiff drum loop and a hiccupping synth bass that suggests dance-pop – the music is still slick, shiny, and soft, music that can appeal to the widest possible audience. 17 did indeed find the widest possible audience, as it ruled radio into late 1985, by which time there were plenty of imitators of Foster's style. There may have been plenty of imitators – soon, solo Cetera was one of them, making music that was indistinguishable from this – but nobody bettered Foster, and Chicago 17 is his pièce de résistance, a record that sounded so good it didn't quite matter that some of the material didn't stick as songs; as a production, it was the pinnacle of his craft and one of the best adult contemporary records of the '80s, perhaps the best of them all. Certainly, it's hard to think of another adult contemporary album quite as influential within its style as this – not only did it color the records that followed, but it's hard not to think of Chicago 17 as the place where soft rock moved away from the warm, lush sounds that defined the style in the late '70s and early '80s and moved toward the crisp, meticulous, synthesized sound of adult contemporary pop, for better or worse, depending on your point of view.

Tracklist:

01 - Stay The Night
02 - We Can Stop The Hurtin'
03 - Hard Habit To Break
04 - Only You
05 - Remember The Feeling
06 - Along Comes A Woman
07 - You're The Inspiration
08 - Please Hold On
09 - Prima Donna
10 - Once In A Lifetime

Analyzed: Chicago / Chicago 17
––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

DR Peak RMS Duration Track
––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
DR13 -0.97 dB -16.12 dB 3:50 01-Stay The Night
DR12 -0.07 dB -15.32 dB 4:12 02-We Can Stop The Hurtin'
DR13 -0.60 dB -16.73 dB 4:45 03-Hard Habit To Break
DR13 -1.03 dB -16.11 dB 3:55 04-Only You
DR14 -1.11 dB -18.60 dB 4:32 05-Remember The Feeling
DR13 0.00 dB -15.69 dB 4:16 06-Along Comes A Woman
DR14 -0.12 dB -16.35 dB 3:49 07-You're The Inspiration
DR13 -0.95 dB -16.62 dB 3:38 08-Please Hold On
DR12 -1.32 dB -16.41 dB 4:12 09-Prima Donna
DR13 -1.00 dB -15.96 dB 4:13 10-Once In A Lifetime
––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Number of tracks: 10
Official DR value: DR13

Samplerate: 192000 Hz
Channels: 2
Bits per sample: 24
Bitrate: 5045 kbps
Codec: FLAC
================================================================================



Chicago - The Hi-Res Album Collection (1969-2014) [24bit/192kHz] Combined RE-UP

Chicago - Chicago 18 (1986/2013)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/192 kHz | Time - 45:24 minutes | 1,8 GB
Studio Master, Official Digital Download | Artwork: Front cover

Chicago 18 is the band’s Gold-certified 1986 recording. It is the first album of the post-Peter Cetera era. This instant-classic features the Top Ten singles “Will You Still Love Me?” and “If She Would Have Been Faithful.” The record showcases everything the band does well and is one of rock’s greatest releases.

Chicago 17 was a peak for the '80s incarnation of Chicago, the ideal blend of Peter Cetera's adult-pop craft and David Foster's slick yet lush production, an album that spawned four huge singles and went platinum six times, turning it into their biggest hit ever. There was nowhere to go but down but there was little indication how far Chicago 18 would take them. Cetera decided that the blockbuster success of Chicago 17 would be a perfect launching pad for a solo career, so he bolted prior to the recording of 18 – but the band didn't pause, hiring Jason Scheff as his replacement and retaining Foster as producer in the hopes of replicating the success of its predecessor. Certainly, Chicago 18 is within the vein of 17 but there are some crucial differences, all stemming from the departure of Cetera. Without him, a certain warmth is missing, both in the writing and in the sound, as all the smooth soft sounds turn into something strident and slick. Foster's production relies too heavily on stiff synthesized sounds and boomy echoes; everything is pushed to the front, so it's not easy to sink into the production, the way it was on 17. This, along with a severe drought in good new songs – only the by-committee power ballad "Will You Still Love Me?" works in this context (the other hit single, "If She Would Have Been Faithful…," has just too weird a conceit to work) – is a greater detriment than the utterly anonymous Scheff, who performs his role as the stand-in Cetera ably. He slips into the allotted spaces in Foster's production, never standing out from the wall of sound – and neither does Chicago as a band, either, even if they try so mightily to assert their identity that they revive "25 or 6 to 4," a misguided move that only reveals that they're not in control here, Foster is.

Tracklist:

01 - Niagara Falls
02 - Forever
03 - If She Would Have Been Faithful
04 - 25 Or 6 To 4
05 - Will You Still Love Me?
06 - Over And Over
07 - It's Alright
08 - Nothin's Gonna Stop Us Now
09 - I Believe
10 - One More Day

Analyzed: Chicago / Chicago 18
––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

DR Peak RMS Duration Track
––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
DR13 -0.13 dB -15.34 dB 3:46 01-Niagara Falls
DR14 -0.42 dB -17.10 dB 5:20 02-Forever
DR12 -1.58 dB -16.32 dB 3:51 03-If She Would Have Been Faithful
DR13 -0.55 dB -16.61 dB 4:22 04-25 Or 6 To 4
DR13 -2.48 dB -18.00 dB 5:44 05-Will You Still Love Me?
DR13 -0.42 dB -15.81 dB 4:20 06-Over And Over
DR13 -0.03 dB -15.36 dB 4:30 07-It's Alright
DR13 -0.21 dB -17.41 dB 4:53 08-Nothin's Gonna Stop Us Now
DR13 -2.36 dB -18.29 dB 4:24 09-I Believe
DR13 -2.50 dB -18.02 dB 4:14 10-One More Day
––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Number of tracks: 10
Official DR value: DR13

Samplerate: 192000 Hz
Channels: 2
Bits per sample: 24
Bitrate: 5135 kbps
Codec: FLAC
================================================================================



Chicago - The Hi-Res Album Collection (1969-2014) [24bit/192kHz] Combined RE-UP

Chicago - Now: Chicago XXXVI (2014)
FLAC (tracks) 24-bit/96 kHz | Time - 50:22 minutes | 1,11 GB
Studio Master, Official Digital Download | Artwork: Front cover

NOW (Chicago XXXVI) is the band's first new album of original material since the release of XXX in 2006, and once again these icons offer their signature fiery, jazz-rooted brass arrangements over slick pop rock songs.

Forty-five years into the band's career, the seemingly straightforward numerical system Chicago follow to title their albums has gotten confusing. Their 2014 offering Now: Chicago XXXVI is clearly their 36th record but it is only their 23rd studio album and, to muddle matters more, it is their first collection of brand-new original material since Chicago XXX in 2006 (the 2008 release of Chicago XXXII: Stone of Sisyphus doesn't really count, as that was initially scheduled for release in 1994, which would've made it Chicago XXII or so). Hence, the decision to put "Now" in front of Chicago XXXVI instead of behind: it emphasizes that this record showcases the band in the present, not the past. That Chicago's Now sounds tethered to the Chicago of the early '80s is neither here nor there. At this point, Chicago exist within their own universe, something made plain by the construction of Now, where each songwriter within Chicago acted as producer on his own tracks. Far from sounding disparate, Now is united in sound and sensibility, anchored upon the splashy horn-fueled jazz-pop they pioneered in the '70s but usually returning to the slick professional adult contemporary of the '80s, the music they made just before and just after Peter Cetera left. A few signifiers of the 2010s are peppered throughout the record – there's the untrammeled patriotism of "America" ("America is free/America is you and me") and the murky protest politics of "Naked in the Garden of Allah," which is set to a spooky synth beat straight out of Knight Rider – and there's a digital crispness that can't be denied but, apart from that, these songs would've sounded at home in 1982 or 1983. While this would seem like it might be a step backward – after all, Chicago XXX was indebted to the early '90s – the songs here flow naturally. They're big, smooth, cheerful, and bright, emphasizing melody over instrumental interplay, explicitly evoking the past without re-creating it and, in 2014, that is likely what most Chicago fans would want.

Tracklist:

01 - Now
02 - More Will Be Revealed
03 - America
04 - Crazy Happy
05 - Free At Last
06 - Love Lives On
07 - Somethings Coming I Know
08 - Watching All The Colors
09 - Nice Girl
10 - Naked In The Garden Of Allah
11 - Another Trippy Day

Analyzed: Chicago / Now: Chicago XXXVI
––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

DR Peak RMS Duration Track
––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
DR10 -0.30 dB -12.19 dB 4:57 01-Now
DR11 -0.30 dB -13.28 dB 5:15 02-More Will Be Revealed
DR11 -0.30 dB -12.90 dB 4:16 03-America
DR10 -0.30 dB -12.44 dB 5:02 04-Crazy Happy
DR11 -0.30 dB -13.77 dB 5:13 05-Free At Last
DR11 -0.30 dB -12.87 dB 5:19 06-Love Lives On
DR10 -0.30 dB -11.71 dB 3:45 07-Somethings Coming I Know
DR10 -0.30 dB -11.67 dB 4:13 08-Watching All The Colors
DR10 -0.30 dB -12.53 dB 4:00 09-Nice Girl
DR10 -0.30 dB -12.85 dB 4:24 10-Naked In The Garden Of Allah
DR10 -0.30 dB -12.14 dB 3:58 11-Another Trippy Day
––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Number of tracks: 11
Official DR value: DR10

Samplerate: 96000 Hz
Channels: 2
Bits per sample: 24
Bitrate: 3024 kbps
Codec: FLAC
================================================================================


Thanks to the Original customer(s)!


Chicago Transit Authority (1969)
Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3


Chicago II (1970)
Part 1 | Part 2


Chicago V (1972)
Part 1 | Part 2


Chicago VIII (1975)
Part 1 | Part 2


Chicago X (1976)
Part 1 | Part 2


Chicago XI (1977)
Part 1 | Part 2


Hot Streets (1978)
Part 1 | Part 2


Chicago 13 (1979)
Part 1 | Part 2


Chicago 16 (1982)
Part 1 | Part 2


Chicago 17 (1984)
Part 1 | Part 2


Chicago 18 (1986)
Part 1 | Part 2


Now: Chicago XXXVI (2014)
Part 1 | Part 2


password: AvaxHome




.