Gentle Giant - Free Hand (1975) Capitol Records/SN-16048 - US Jacksonville Pressing - LP/FLAC In 24bit/96kHz

Posted By: Fran Solo
Gentle Giant - Free Hand (1975) Capitol Records/SN-16048 - US Jacksonville Pressing - LP/FLAC In 24bit/96kHz

Gentle Giant - Free Hand
Vinyl | LP Cover (1:1) | FLAC + cue | 24bit/96kHz & 16bit/44kHz | 1300mb & 400mb
Mastered By Gene Thompson & Ken Perry
Label: Capitol Records/SN-160 | Release: 1975 | This Issue: 1980 | Genre: Symphonic-Rock


A1 Just The Same 5:31
A2 On Reflection 5:40
A3 Free Hand 6:15
-
B1 Time To Kill 5:05
B2 His Last Voyage 6:26
B3 Taly Bont 2:41
B4 Moblie 5:01


Companies, etc.
Phonographic Copyright (p) – Capitol Records, Inc.
Recorded At – Advision Studios
Pressed By – Capitol Records Pressing Plant, Jacksonville
Published By – Moth Music Inc.
Credits
Composed By – Derek Shulman, Kerry Minnear, Ray Shulman
Design [Cover Design] – Gentle Giant
Engineer – Gary Martin (3)
Engineer [Assistant] – Paul Northfield
Graphics – Richard Evans (7)
Mastered By – Gene Thompson (tracks: B), Ken Perry (tracks: A)
Performer – Derek Shulman, Gary Green, John Weathers, Kerry Minnear, Ray Shulman
Producer – Gentle Giant
Notes
A Gentle Giant Production.
A Capitol Re-Issue
Release pressed by Capitol Records Pressing Plant, Jacksonville.
Barcode and Other Identifiers
Barcode (Printed): 0 7777-16048-1
Barcode (Scanned): 0077771604812
Matrix / Runout (Side A Label): SN-1-16048
Matrix / Runout (Side B Label): SN-2-16048
Matrix / Runout (Side A Runout Etched): SN-1-16048 S̶̷̲̅T̶̷̲̅1̶̷̲̅ 1̶̷̲̅1̶̷̲̅4̶̷̲̅2̶̷̲̅8̶̷̲̅ F1 #3 KP
Matrix / Runout (Side B Runout Etched): SN-2-16048- G2#1 gene ⨁
Matrix / Runout (Both Sides Stamped): MASTERED BY CAPITOL 0
Rights Society: BMI


Gentle Giant - Free Hand (1975) Capitol Records/SN-16048 - US Jacksonville Pressing - LP/FLAC In 24bit/96kHz

Gentle Giant - Free Hand (1975) Capitol Records/SN-16048 - US Jacksonville Pressing - LP/FLAC In 24bit/96kHz

Gentle Giant - Free Hand (1975) Capitol Records/SN-16048 - US Jacksonville Pressing - LP/FLAC In 24bit/96kHz



Cleaning: RCM Moth MkII Pro Vinyl
Direct Drive Turntable: Technics SL-1200MK2 Quartz
Cartridge: SHURE M97xE With JICO SAS Stylus
Amplifier: Marantz 2252
ADC: E-MU 0404
DeClick with iZotope RX5: Only Manual (Click per click)
Vinyl Condition: NM-
This LP: From my personal collection
LP Rip & Full Scan LP Cover: Fran Solo
Password: WITHOUT PASSWORD

Admittedly, many prog rock fans with otherwise excellent taste in music find Gentle Giant rather hard to get into. Their music certainly is challenging, and very varied in flavour. At times it evokes Medieval music, at other times there are a cappella vocals delivered in a quasi-“round” format, in company with passages that veer from moments of delicate beauty to “rocking out.” All of these musical paths, and more, are often explored within the space of a single song. (Of course, that could be part of a generic description of progressive rock.) Gentle Giant have an inimitable style that is difficult to categorize; they must be heard to be understood. Perhaps only those with the most open musical minds will find them at all accessible. Certainly, though major players of the 70s prog scene, “Giant” never fully rose above their cult status to approach the popularity and critical acclaim of contemporaries like Genesis, Yes, ELP, Pink Floyd or Jethro Tull. (Though Gentle Giant don’t really sound like any of those heavyweights, their music bears a somewhat closer resemblance to that of ‘Tull, than any of the others mentioned.)
As I observed, Gentle Giant are not exactly the most approachable band in the prog universe; their music tends to invoke extreme love or hate reactions from first-time listeners. With that caveat out of the way, I would urge those who are curious about the band, or simply those who are in search of “something completely different,” to start with this excellent recording. “Free Hand” encapsulates Gentle Giant’s sound at the top of its form. It is not as “difficult” as “The Power and the Glory” (its excellent predecessor) or “Interview” (its good, but uneven successor), nor as commercial as later efforts.

The overall sound of the disc (if G.G. can be said to have an “overall” sound) is driven by keyboards, electric guitar, violin, and the unique “vocal stylings” of lead singer Derek Shulman and company.

The album, fittingly enough for this mold-breaking group, is loosely written around the theme of individual choice and freedom. The songs are all very good, but, to my taste, the title track, “His Last Voyage” and “Time to Kill” are particularly effective. (I still get a kick out of the sound of the “Pong” game at the beginning of the latter track: if, like me, you can remember when Pong was a cutting-edge video game — indeed, the ONLY video game — then you’re showing your age….) Highly recommended to fans, and to those with sufficiently eclectic and diverse tastes to “get it.”
Review by Peter, progarchives.com
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