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Eddie Kirkland - Lonely Street (1997)

Posted By: Designol
Eddie Kirkland - Lonely Street (1997)

Eddie Kirkland - Lonely Street (1997)
with Tab Benoit, Sonny Landreth, Kenny Neal, Cub Koda
Christine Ohlman, G.E. Smith, Jaimoe, Richard Bell

EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue&Log) ~ 305 Mb | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 110 Mb | Scans ~ 107 Mb
Modern Electric Blues, Soul-Blues | Label: Telarc | # CD-83424 | Time: 00:48:03

Jamaican-born bluesman Kirkland has always stretched the boundaries of his music and on this outing moves further into contemporary waters. Guest stars abound on this album, and Kirkland's idiosyncratic guitar work is answered and abetted by appearances from Tab Benoit, Sonny Landreth, Kenny Neal, Cub Koda, Christine Ohlman and G.E. Smith, as well as driving work from drummer Jaimoe and organist Richard Bell. The material is all over the road, but particularly noteworthy as highlights are Kirkland's take on Elmore James' "Done Somebody Wrong," "Snake In the Grass," "Nightgirl," and the title track.

VA - A Tribute To Howlin' Wolf (1998)

Posted By: Designol
VA - A Tribute To Howlin' Wolf (1998)

Various Artists - A Tribute To Howlin' Wolf (1998)
EAC | FLAC | Tracks (Cue&Log) ~ 340 Mb | Scans included | Time: 00:52:21
Blues, Blues-Rock, Rock & Roll | Label: Telarc | # CD-83427

Howlin' Wolf may be gone, but his spirit lives on, as this 13-track tribute album featuring members of the Wolf's own band attests. Sam Lay, Eddie Shaw, Hubert Sumlin, and the rest are as tight and smooth as they ever were playing behind Howlin' Wolf, and they've got an array of guest stars to do the Wolf proud. Taj Mahal (sounding a good bit like Wolf himself) is here, as are guitar-slinger Debbie Davies and multi-instrumentalist Kenny Neal. Lucinda Williams does a bluesy turn, and there are contributions from Lucky Peterson, James Cotton, and more. The CD features plenty of Wolf favorites, including "Saddle My Pony," "Howlin' for My Darling," "The Red Rooster," "Howlin' Wolf Boogie," and "Smokestack Lightnin'," among others. All in all, it's a fitting tribute to a man whose contribution to the blues is immeasurable.