Seijun Suzuki-Koroshi no rakuin ('Branded to Kill') (1967)

Posted By: FNB47
Seijun Suzuki-Koroshi no rakuin ('Branded to Kill') (1967)

Seijun Suzuki-Koroshi no rakuin ('Branded to Kill') (1967)
729.1 MB | 1:31:10 | Japanese with Eng.+Tur. s/t | XviD, 995 Kb/s | 672x304

Branded to Kill, the wildly perverse story of the yakuza’s rice-sniffing “No. 3 Killer,” is Seijun Suzuki at his delirious best. From a cookie-cutter studio script, Suzuki delivered this brutal, hilarious, and visually inspired masterpiece—and was promptly fired. Criterion

Seijun Suzuki-Koroshi no rakuin ('Branded to Kill') (1967)

Seijun Suzuki-Koroshi no rakuin ('Branded to Kill') (1967)

Seijun Suzuki-Koroshi no rakuin ('Branded to Kill') (1967)


The film's story centers on Hanada, a.k.a. "No. 3 Killer," the third-best hit man in Japanese organized crime. Near the top of his game, his fortunes change when he encounters Misako, a mysterious, death-obsessed woman who brings him a particularly difficult mission. In a famous moment indicative of the film's eccentric sensibility, a butterfly lands on his gun's sight at the exact moment he pulls the trigger, causing him to miss the shot. This failure means that the killer becomes the target, and must run for his life from his former employers, and the mysterious "No. 1 Killer." While the film does contain some spectacular action sequences, the story is played less as a suspense thriller than as a surrealistic, psychosexual nightmare, filled with grotesque imagery and strange touches, from Hanada's fetish for the smell of boiling rice, to Misako's use of a dead bird's corpse as a rear-view mirror decoration. (http://imdb.com/title/tt0061882/plotsummary)

Seijun Suzuki-Koroshi no rakuin ('Branded to Kill') (1967)

Seijun Suzuki-Koroshi no rakuin ('Branded to Kill') (1967)

Seijun Suzuki-Koroshi no rakuin ('Branded to Kill') (1967)


Seijun Suzuki's absolutely mad yakuza movie bends the hit-man genre so out of shape it more resembles a Luis Bunuel take on Martin Scorsese. Number three killer Goro Hanada (Jo Shishido) is a hired killer who loves his work, but when he misses a target after a mere butterfly sets his carefully balanced aim astray, he becomes the next target of the mob. Goro is no pushover and easily dispatches the first comers, leaving them splayed in death contortions that could qualify for an Olympic event, but the rat-a-tat violence gives way to a surreal, sadistic game of cat and mouse. (–Sean Axmaker - Editorial Reviews - Amazon.com)

Seijun Suzuki-Koroshi no rakuin ('Branded to Kill') (1967)

Seijun Suzuki-Koroshi no rakuin ('Branded to Kill') (1967)

Seijun Suzuki-Koroshi no rakuin ('Branded to Kill') (1967)


The legendary Number One mercilessly taunts his target before moving in with him in a macho, testosterone-laden Odd Couple truce that ends up with them handcuffed together. Kinky? Not compared to earlier scenes. The smell of boiling rice sets Goro's libido for his mistress so aflame that Suzuki censors the gymnastic sex with animated black bars that come to life in an animated cha-cha. Because Suzuki pushed his yakuza parodies and cinematic surrealism too far, his studio, Nikkatsu, finally called in their own metaphoric hit and fired the director with such force that he was effectively blackballed from the industry for a decade. It took about that long for audiences to embrace his audacious genre bending–Suzuki's pop-art sensibilities were just a bit ahead of their time. (–Sean Axmaker - Editorial Reviews - Amazon.com)

Seijun Suzuki-Koroshi no rakuin ('Branded to Kill') (1967)

Seijun Suzuki-Koroshi no rakuin ('Branded to Kill') (1967)

Seijun Suzuki-Koroshi no rakuin ('Branded to Kill') (1967)


On first glance this movie appears to be just another gangster movie relegated to late, late night television. Tough talking gangsters, intrigue, action, etc., etc. However, watching for more than 5 to 10 minutes highlight the ultra-bizarre characters, very substantial level of brutality, and the uniquely perverse (and amusing) sense of humor that really set this movie apart from other "stock" gangster films.(amazon.com)

Seijun Suzuki-Koroshi no rakuin ('Branded to Kill') (1967)

Seijun Suzuki-Koroshi no rakuin ('Branded to Kill') (1967)

Seijun Suzuki-Koroshi no rakuin ('Branded to Kill') (1967)


Rice-sniffing, #3 Killer, dead butterflies, snuff films. Where to start? 'Koroshi no rakuin' is a surreal, Kafkaesque, timewarp of a film masquerading as a stylish 60's hit-man movie. Nikkatsu Studios fired Seijun Suzuki over this film's "incomprehensibility." Suzuki is an auteur of the highest magnitude, nobody has ever used a widescreen, black and white, "Nikkatsu Scope" frame quite like him. The dense and beautifully chaotic images are overwhelming on your first viewing, it's the sort of movie that shows you something new every time you watch it. (http://imdb.com/title/tt0061882/usercomments)

Seijun Suzuki-Koroshi no rakuin ('Branded to Kill') (1967)

Seijun Suzuki-Koroshi no rakuin ('Branded to Kill') (1967)

Seijun Suzuki-Koroshi no rakuin ('Branded to Kill') (1967)


Essentially Hanado Goro (Jo Shisido) is the yakuza's #3 Killer, but he desperately wants to be #1. As might be expected, being a hired gun is a stressful life and Hanado takes the edge off with lots of sex and the smell of boiling rice. The sex gets him embroiled in some sort of a plot and he finds himself getting much better acquainted with #1 Killer than he'd ever wanted to be.Time backs up, swirls around, restarts, slows down. Major themes include, but are not limited to: ambition, lust, rivalry, bureaucracy, addiction, loss of self-control. There's a certain parallel in that with this picture Suzuki derailed his own career as a "salary man" making Nikkatsu yakuza flicks, many of Hanado's thoughts and impulses must have been the director's own. (http://imdb.com/title/tt0061882/usercomments)