Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time (2010)

Posted By: denisbul
Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time (2010)

Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time (2010)
Langs: English, Spanish, Portuguese | Subs: English, Spanish, Portuguese
DVD9 (VIDEO_TS) | 116 min | NTSC 16:9 (720 x 480) | AC3 5.1 - 448 Kbps | 5,98 GB
Genre: Action, Adventure, Fantasy, Romance | USA

IMDB: 6.7/10 (67,783 votes)
Directed by: Mike Newell
Starring: Jake Gyllenhaal, Alfred Molina, Gemma Arterton, Ben Kingsley

Set in the mystical lands of Persia, a rogue prince and a mysterious princess race against dark forces to safeguard an ancient dagger capable of releasing the Sands of Time a gift from the gods that can reverse time and allow its possessor to rule the world.

Adopted from the streets of Nasaf by King Sharaman of Persia, young Dastan grows up amongst royalty and quickly earns his place as a mighty warrior and prince. As his brothers Garsiv and Tus plan battle strategies, a spy sends word that the Holy City of Alamut has been supplying weapons to enemies of Persia. Taking matters into his own hands, Tus orders an attack on the sacred city and upon its fall Dastan encounters the beautiful Princess Tamina. When King Sharaman dies under mysterious circumstances shortly after, and Dastan is accused of his murder, he flees with the princess on a harrowing mission to clear his name. Learning from Tamina the true motives behind Alamut's invasion, Dastan must embark on a perilous quest to stop an evil mastermind's plot for ultimate power with a mystical weapon that can control the very fabric of time.
Written by The Massie Twins
Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time (2010)

Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time (2010)

In Persia, in the Royal City of Nasaf, the fair King Sharaman rules the empire with his brother Nizan. Sharaman has two sons, but adopts the orphan Dastan that becomes part of his family. Years later, the Holy City of Alamut ruled by Princess Tamina is under siege of the troops led by Tus, Garsiv and Dastan, after their uncle Nizan had intercepted a spy carrying weapons for Alamut. Dastan invades the city with his men to avoid a massacre and the Persian army conquers the city. Dastan gets a dagger from an enemy and King Sharaman comes to Almut very upset with the invasion of the holy city. Then he arranges the marriage of Dastan with Princess Tamina. When Dastan gives a holy cloak delivered by Tus to his father, the mantle is poisoned and kills Sharaman. Dastan is accused of betrayal but he escapes with Princess Ttamina. Sooner he finds that the dagger is a powerful device to travel and change time and that Tus is not the traitor and he engages with Tamina in a quest for justice.
Written by Claudio Carvalho, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time (2010)

Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time (2010)

At the height of the Persian Empire's power and influence, the King's stepson Prince Dastan leads an attack on the sacred city of Alamut under orders from the Crown Prince, Tus, after it is revealed the city may be the source of arms for their enemies. The battle is quickly won and Dastan takes possession of an interesting dagger, one that Alamut's Princess Tamina is keen to recover. Dastan is soon on the run however when his gift to the King poisons him, putting Tus on the throne. Tamina tells him the importance of the dagger - it can transport the bearer back in time. With his new found weapon, Dastan sets out to change past events and learn the identity of the man who betrayed them and killed his stepfather.
Written by garykmcd
Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time (2010)

Director Mike Newell and producer Jerry Bruckheimer's Prince of Persia tells the story of Dastan (William Foster), an orphan whose selflessness attracts the attention of the king (Ronald Pickup). Adopted and made a prince, the young boy is raised as a warrior and swordsman, and soon becomes one of his father's most trusted commanders (not to mention the spitting image of Jake Gyllenhaal). All changes though fifteen years later when Dastan secretly steals a mystical weapon a dagger with power over time itself during a vicious attack on the sacred city of Alamut led by his brother, Tus (Richard Coyle). But while news of the assault infuriates the king, his anger is short-lived. Literally. Poisoned by a sinister assailant, the king is killed and Dastan is blamed for his murder. With little choice but to flee the region, Dastan sets out to clear his name, avenge his father, and unravel the plot behind his death. He even joins forces with an unlikely ally: Tamina (Clash of the Titans' Gemma Arterton), a feisty Alamutian princess determined to protect Dastan's recently acquired dagger. It seems Dastan's dastardly uncle, Nizam (Ben Kingsley), is after the dagger too, and hopes to use its magic to change history and claim Persia's throne as his own. Can Dastan and Tamina put a stop to Nizam's nefarious plot? Will romance bloom in the desert between our two reluctant heroes? Will a colorful cast of characters help them battle a band of sword-slinging baddies? Is there a Prince of Persia question that doesn't come chained to a predictable answer?

Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time (2010)

Arterton imbues Tamina with welcome assertiveness and wherewithal, and Kingsley gnaws, savors and spits out his fair share of chewy scenes, but Gyllenhaal – miscast, mismanaged and misused is out of his element. While his commitment to an increasingly complex series of stunts and action sequences is certainly commendable, his somber eyes and sullen weariness are at constant odds with the swashbuckling, time-bending adventure that ensues. His scenes with Arterton are a drag as well, and their symbiotic turmoil is as problematic as the film's copious use of green screen. The pair aim for playfulness, but settle on snarkiness; attempt to kindle a convincing romance, but forge little more than a superficial, malnourished connection; try to embrace sillier aspects of the plot with as much sneering tenacity as Kingsley, but rarely relent or sully their neatly-manicured nails. Individually, they're serviceable leads. (Gyllenhaal's spry exchanges are appreciated, and Arterton's coy wit keeps her various encounters lively.) Together though, they lack the spark and effortlessness their sand-crossed lovers so desperately require. Gyllenhaal's swordsmanship and physicality is far more believable than anything else he brings to the table, and it's a shame he struggles to make Dastan anything more than a roguish, distinctly European incarnation of his videogame counterpart. It doesn't help that the plot, though fairly faithful to the franchise, serves up an uninspired mish-mash of familiar characters, obvious twists and choreographed dust-ups the likes of which wore out their welcome ten years ago. At its best, it treads water alongside the Pirates of the Caribbean sequels. At its worst, it… erm, treads water alongside the Pirates of the Caribbean sequels.

Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time (2010)

Still, as fun, shallow summer fare goes, Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time isn't nearly as bad as it could have been. Numerous scenes give up the ghost, but just as many showcase what could have been. Swords clash with palpable electricity, time reversals bring with them a host of visual wonders, and Kingsley and his henchmen place many a daunting obstacle in Dastan's path. Newell even unearths several redemptive character arcs that infuses some dramatic weight into the film's at-times hollow theatrics. If nothing else, Prince of Persia skirts by with momentum, humor and a string of exciting action sequences, all of which make Newell's trek across the desert entirely digestible. (Even enjoyable on occasion.) It's a sad state of affairs when such a middle-of-the-road adventure emerges as one of the best videogame adaptations in Hollywood's canon, but I suppose you have to start somewhere. Give it a rent and see if it appeals to your tastes.
Reviewed by Kenneth Brown

Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time (2010)

Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time (2010)

Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time (2010)