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Quiet Rage: The Stanford Prison Experiment (1992)

Posted By: Someonelse
SD / DVD IMDb
Quiet Rage: The Stanford Prison Experiment (1992)

Quiet Rage: The Stanford Prison Experiment (1992)
DVD5 | VIDEO_TS | NTSC 4:3 | 00:51:59 | 3,10 Gb
Audio: English LPCM 2.0 @ 1536 Kbps | Subs: None
Genre: Documentary

Director: Ken Musen
Writer: Philip Zimbardo

In the summer of 1971, Philip Zimbardo, Craig Haney, and Curtis Banks carried out a psychological experiment to test a simple question: What happens when you put good people in an evil place – does humanity win over evil, or does evil triumph? To explore this question, college student volunteers were pretested and randomly assigned to play the role of prisoner or guard in a simulated prison at Stanford University. Although the students were mentally healthy and knew they were taking part in an experiment, some guards soon became sadistic and the prisoners showed signs of acute stress and depression. After only six days, the planned two-week study spun out of control and had to be ended to prevent further abuse of the prisoners. This dramatic demonstration of power of social situations is relevant to many institutional settings, such as the Abu Ghraib Prison in Iraq.



Quiet Rage: The Stanford Prison Experiment (1992)

Uncomfortable, unsettling, unnerving, and any other unpleasant “un” you can think of – the Stanford prison experiment was a simulation conducted in 1971 at Stanford University under the supervision of Dr. Philip Zimbardo. 24 male college students were chosen. Participants received $15 per day (equivalent to $87 in 2015).

Quiet Rage: The Stanford Prison Experiment (1992)

A hyper-realistic environment was established in a nondescript hallway in the basement of Jordan Hall (Stanford’s psychology building). 9 plus 3 alternates were assigned the role of prisoner while 9 others plus 3 backups were designated as guards. The ascribed parts being determined by a coin toss. No one wanted to be a guard, many determining there was more work involved. Zimbardo monitored their roleplay from another room via surveillance cameras as the superintendent. An undergraduate research assistant assumed the character of the warden. It was to run between 7 to 14 days. Zimbardo pulled the plug on the whole exercise after only 6.

Quiet Rage: The Stanford Prison Experiment (1992)

Kyle Patrick Alvarez directs a skilled cast. Billy Crudup is the very real, still living, psychologist Philip Zimbardo who led the notorious experiment which studied the psychological effects of becoming a prisoner or guard. He heads up an impressive cast of up and coming future stars. The production is highlighted by a flawless ensemble that demonstrates the various intricacies of how the whole enterprise devolved.

Quiet Rage: The Stanford Prison Experiment (1992)

The largest parts going to Ezra Miller who plays the most defiant and Michael Angarano who emerges as the most brutal. Before the venture began Zimbardo instructed the guards not to physically harm the prisoners. However he did motivate them to be controlling, to take away their individuality and to create a sense of fear and powerlessness. The participants adapted to their roles way past Zimbardo’s expectations.

Quiet Rage: The Stanford Prison Experiment (1992)

The Stanford Prison Experiment is a frustrating watch. The guards negatively treat the detainees in ever increasing shocking and dehumanizing ways. Initially a few prisoners resist with acts of rebellion, but more often than not they start to concede to their situation. Their passive acceptance is no less disquieting. This conduct over the course of the drama is not easy viewing. What we see is personalties change. These are not prisoners/guards. These are privileged upper-middle-class college students attending Stanford.

Quiet Rage: The Stanford Prison Experiment (1992)

Guards grow sadistic while prisoners become submissive. They act out the roles expected of them in a way far beyond what anyone involved with the study could have expected. The undertaking is a bit exasperating. I had many questions and concerns about how the whole operation was handled and the validity of the results. However, as a document of a notorious experiment gone wrong (or right depending on what you wanted to prove) I found it to be an arresting study in human behavior. I can’t say I enjoyed The Stanford Prison Experiment, but I did respect the craft that when into making it.
Quiet Rage: The Stanford Prison Experiment (1992)
Quiet Rage: The Stanford Prison Experiment (1992)
Quiet Rage: The Stanford Prison Experiment (1992)
Quiet Rage: The Stanford Prison Experiment (1992)


Special Features:
- 70 images slide show of archival photographs from the study

All Credits goes to Original uploader.