Sandman Volume 2 - The Dolls House

Posted By: sanskritter


The immense popularity of Neil Gaiman's Sandman series is due in large part to the development of his characters. In The Doll's House, the second book of the Sandman magnum opus, Gaiman continues to build the foundation for the larger story, introducing us to more of the Dream King's family of the Endless.

Alan Moore - V for Vendetta

Posted By: sanskritter


V for Vendetta
Words by Alan Moore - Art by David Lloyd - Published by DC Comics (US), Titan Books (UK) - First published 1988 - Originally published in Warrior Magazine and as V for Vendetta 1-10

Jesus Meets The Armed Services - Rip Off Press 1972

Posted By: sanskritter


Jesus Meets The Armed Services | Jul 1972 (3rd Edition) Rip Off Press


During "Jesus Meets the Armed Services," Jesus is walking along minding his business when a couple of MPs drag him into their jeep and drive him down to police headquarters yelling, "A-ha! We got us a deserter traveling incognito." Jesus points to his halo and tells the sergeant, "Maybe this will tell you who I am." The sergeant replies, "Mr. Wizard? Who'd of ever thot you'd drop out?" He makes Jesus go upstairs to register for the draft, after which he's sent off to Chattanooga to take his tests to join the Army. Finally Jesus gets tired of being pushed around and zaps his tormentors. Stack's is a devastating political and social satire of the military.

Neil Gaiman - Violent Cases

Posted By: sanskritter


Neil Gaiman, «Violent Cases» | ISBN 1569717990


Both Gaiman's precise and nostalgic writing and McKean's lavishly painted art will challenge your ideas of what a comic book is. A narrator remembers his childhood encounters with an old osteopath who claims to have treated Al Capone. Gradually, 1960s England and 1920s Chicago begin to merge into a tale of memory and evil. This is the first published work of the acclaimed writer of The Sandman series; fans of that series should not miss this.

Neil Gaiman & Dave Mckean - Signal To Noise

Posted By: sanskritter
Signal to Noise



Originally serialized in The Face, Signal to Noise is the story of a film director dying of cancer. His life's crowning achievement, his greatest film, would have told the story of a European village as the last hour of 999 A.D. approached -- the midnight that the villagers were convinced would bring with it Armageddon. Now that story will never be told. But he's still working it out in his head, making a film that no one will ever see. No one but us.

Art Spiegelman's Maus - A Survivors Tale Part 2

Posted By: sanskritter


Art Spiegelman's Maus – A Survivors Tale – Part 02

Art Spiegelman's Maus - A Survivors Tale Part 1

Posted By: sanskritter


Art Spiegelman's Maus – A Survivors Tale – Part 01

Alan Moore - V for Vendetta

Posted By: sanskritter
reposted as per request!



Words by Alan Moore - Art by David Lloyd - Published by DC Comics (US), Titan Books (UK) - First published 1988 - Originally published in Warrior Magazine and as V for Vendetta 1-10

Grant Morrison & Dave Mckean - Batman, Arkham Asylum

Posted By: sanskritter


Arkham Asylum goes beyond just comic and comic book cliches and standards. It is, without doubt, the most complex and sophiscated graphic story treatment ever given to a superhero. Reading this 15 years ago, it sent a chill up my spine. Now it just envelopes me totally.

Alan Moore - From Hell

Posted By: sanskritter


The mad, shaggy genius of the comics world dips deeply into the well of history and pulls up a cup filled with blood in From Hell. Alan Moore did a couple of Ph.D.'s worth of research into the Whitechapel murders for this copiously annotated collection of the independently published series.

Neil Gaiman - Signal to Noise

Posted By: sanskritter


Originally serialized in The Face, Signal to Noise is the story of a film director dying of cancer. His life's crowning achievement, his greatest film, would have told the story of a European village as the last hour of 999 A.D. approached -- the midnight that the villagers were convinced would bring with it Armageddon. Now that story will never be told. But he's still working it out in his head, making a film that no one will ever see. No one but us.

Neil Gaiman - Black Orchid

Posted By: sanskritter


About the same time that Neil Gaiman took a little-known hero called the Sandman and created the rich mythology of Dream and the Endless, he reinvented another obscure character, Black Orchid, a plant-based heroine with ties to the likes of Poison Ivy and Swamp Thing. In this three-part story, Gaiman gives a whole new slant to the character, replacing a standard, gimmicky vigilante with a thought-provoking new entity entirely.

Neil Gaiman - Violent Cases

Posted By: sanskritter


Both Gaiman's precise and nostalgic writing and McKean's lavishly painted art will challenge your ideas of what a comic book is. A narrator remembers his childhood encounters with an old osteopath who claims to have treated Al Capone. Gradually, 1960s England and 1920s Chicago begin to merge into a tale of memory and evil. This is the first published work of the acclaimed writer of The Sandman series; fans of that series should not miss this.

Neil Gaiman - Mr Punch

Posted By: sanskritter


McKean's art elevates the visuals above the basic flat 2D of most comics, most impressively his use of photographic elements, adding depth and a sense of realism. It more than compliments Gaiman's writing, demonstrating yet again why these two are one of the best creative teams in comics. McKean's work here is still some of the best of his career - sharp, inventive and captivating. The whole design of the book is something to behold, right down the twisting fonts, showing why he is the arguably the best when it comes to doing what he does, as well as the most prone to 'homage'.

Neil Gaiman - The Wolves in the Walls

Posted By: sanskritter


Truth be told, Neil Gaiman and Dave McKean's picture book The Wolves in the Walls is terrifying. Sure, the story is fairytale-like and presented in a jaunty, casually nonsensical way, but it is absolutely the stuff of nightmares. Lucy hears wolves hustling, bustling, crinkling, and crackling in the walls of the old house where her family lives, but no one believes her. Her mother says it's mice, her brother says bats, and her father says what everyone seems to say, "If the wolves come out of the walls, it's all over." Lucy remains convinced, as is her beloved pig-puppet, and her worst fears are confirmed when the wolves actually do come out of the walls.