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Long 19th Century: European History from 1789 to 1917 (The Great Courses, 8190) (Audiobook) (Repost)

Posted By: bookwyrm
Long 19th Century: European History from 1789 to 1917 (The Great Courses, 8190) (Audiobook) (Repost)

Long 19th Century: European History from 1789 to 1917 (The Great Courses, 8190) (Audiobook) By Professor Robert I. Weiner
2005 | 18 hours and 27 mins | ISBN: 1565859936 | MP3 80 kbps (vbr) | 668 MB


History at its most interesting is complex, a fascinating whirl of events, personalities, and forces, and few periods of history offer us such captivating complexity as Europe's 19th "century"—the often-broadly defined period from the French Revolution to World War I that formed the foundation of the modern world. How was that foundation built? And what did that transition to modernity mean for peasants, workers, the middle class, aristocrats, women, and minorities? Why did an era that began with the idealism of the French Revolution and the power of the Industrial Revolution culminate in the chaos of World War I, considered by most historians to be the greatest tragedy of modern European history? Did nationalism and imperialism inevitably lead in such a direction, or were there other factors involved? Even these questions, as important as they are, can only hint at the complexity of this period, just as this course can really only put us on a path toward the answers. Dr. Robert I. Weiner assumes no prior knowledge of this era and no professional vocabulary, "just interest, curiosity, and hopefully, passion." Disclaimers notwithstanding, these lectures indeed offer the opportunity for anyone with an interest in history to take an enormous stride toward understanding the whys of this turbulent and important era, and not just the whats. Professor Weiner, a five-time recipient of Lafayette's Student Government Superior Teaching Award during his 35 years of teaching history at Lafayette College, leads you on a spirited journey across an ever-changing European landscape, examining the forces and personalities that reshaped the continent's physical borders, diplomatic relationships, and balance of power. He moves from the impact of both the French and Industrial Revolutions in the period from 1789–1848, into the so-called "unifications" of Italy and Germany in the 1850s and 1860s, followed by the spread of industrialism and nationalism into the furthest reaches of Europe toward the end of the century. By that time, the world had undergone profound changes: Moreover, the European great powers, organized in alliances and enmeshed in an arms race, were confronting increasingly dangerous international crises. While more people in Europe were living better than ever before, Europe had become a very dangerous place—soon to erupt in a war more brutal than any the world had ever seen.