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Rome and the Barbarians (The Great Courses 3460) (Audiobook) (Repost)

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Rome and the Barbarians (The Great Courses 3460) (Audiobook) (Repost)

Rome and the Barbarians (The Great Courses 3460) (Audiobook) By Professor Kenneth W. Harl
2004 | 18 hours and 29 mins | ISBN: 1565859014 | MP3 32 kbps | 327 MB


The history of the Romans and the "barbarians" they encountered as their mighty legions advanced the frontiers of Classical civilization has in large part been written as a story of warfare and conquest. But to tell the story on only that level leaves many questions unanswered, not only about the Romans but about the barbarians, as well. Who were the Celts, Goths, Huns, Persians, and so many others met by the Romans as they marched to the north and east? And what made them barbarians in the eyes of Rome? What were the political, military, and social institutions that made Rome so stable, allowing its power to be wielded against these different cultures for almost three centuries? What role did those institutions themselves play in assimilating barbarian peoples, first as provincials and often as players in a vast process of Romanization? Rome and the Barbarians tells the story of the complex relationships between each of these native peoples and their Roman conquerors as they intermarried, exchanged ideas and mores, and, in the ensuing provincial Roman cultures, formed the basis of Western European civilization. As you examine the interaction between Rome and the barbarians from 300 B.C. to A.D. 600, you learn that the definition of barbarian was, effectively, the "next group not under Roman control." And you see how that definition was always changing, as former barbarians became assimilated into the Roman world, becoming provincials and, often, eventually Romanized themselves. In leading you through this 900-year period, Tulane University’s Professor Kenneth W. Harl organizes the course around two major themes: Throughout these lectures, and the introduction of each new barbarian culture, Professor Harl emphasizes three crucial aspects of Rome’s relationships to them: 1. The ability of the Romans to adapt and build pragmatically on existing structures of the barbarian world, using what worked, and not simply imposing a "Roman way" 2. The ways the Romans looked on these barbarians not only as outsiders, but also as potential allies and provincials 3. What barbarian societies were like at the time of Roman contact and conquest, and how, through assimilation, they contributed to the successful establishment of Roman provinces.