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International Relations in Psychiatry: Britain, Germany, and the United States to World War II (Rochester Studies in Med

Posted By: roxul
International Relations in Psychiatry: Britain, Germany, and the United States to World War II (Rochester Studies in Med

Volker Roelcke, "International Relations in Psychiatry: Britain, Germany, and the United States to World War II (Rochester Studies in Med"
English | ISBN: 1580463398 | 2010 | 260 pages | PDF | 2 MB

The decades around 1900 were crucial in the evolution of modern medical and social sciences, and in the formation of various national health services systems. The modern fields of psychiatry and mental health care are located at the intersection of these spheres. There emerged concepts, practices, and institutions that marked responses to challenges posed by urbanization, industrialization, and the formation of the nation-state. These psychiatric responses were locally distinctive, and yet at the same time established influential models with an international impact. In spite of rising nationalism in Europe, the intellectual, institutional, and material resources that emerged in the various local and national contexts were rapidly observed to have had an impact beyond any national boundaries. In numerous ways, innovations were adopted and refashioned for the needs and purposes of new national and local systems. International Relations in Psychiatry: Britain, Germany, and the United States to World War II brings together hitherto separate approaches from the social, political, and cultural history of medicine and health care and argues that modern psychiatry developed in a constant, though not always continuous, transfer of ideas, perceptions, and experts across national borders. Contributors: John C. Burnham, Eric J. Engstrom, Rhodri Hayward, Mark Jackson, Pamela Michael, Hans Pols, Volker Roelcke, Heinz-Peter Schmiedebach, Mathew Thomson, Paul J. Weindling, Louise Westwood Volker Roelcke is professor and director at the Institute for the History of Medicine, Giessen University, Germany. Paul J. Weindling is professor in the history of medicine, Oxford Brookes University, UK. Louise Westwood is honorary research reader, University of Sussex, UK.

Table of Contents



Introduction

Inspecting Great Britain: German Psychiatrists' Views of British Asylums in the Second Half of the Nineteenth Century - Heinz-Peter Schmiedebach

Permeating National Boundaries: European and American Influences on the Emergence of "Medico-Pedagogy" in Late Victorian and Edwardian Britain - Mark Jackson

Organizing Psychiatric Research in Munich (1903-1925): A Psychiatric Zoon Politicon between State Bureaucracy and American Philanthropy - Eric J. Engstrom

Germany and the Making of "English" Psychiatry: The Maudsley Hospital, 1908-1939 - Rhodri Hayward

Patterns in Transmitting German Psychiatry to the United States: Smith Ely Jelliffe and the Impact ofWorld War I - John C. Burnham

"Beyond the Clinical Frontiers": The American Mental Hygiene Movement, 1910-1945 - Hans Pols

Mental Hygiene in Britain during the First Half of theTwentieth Century: The Limits of International Influence - Mathew Thomson

Psychiatry in Munich and Yale, ca. 1920-1935: Mutual Perceptions and Relations, and the Case of Eugen Kahn (1887-1973) - Volker Roelcke

Explorations of Scottish, German, and American Psychiatry:The Work of Helen Boyle and Isabel Hutton in the Treatment of Noncertifiable Mental Disorders in England, 1899-1939 - Louise Westwood

Welsh Psychiatry during the Interwar Years, and the Impact of American and German Inspirations and Resources - Pamela Michael

Alien Psychiatrists: The British Assimilation of Psychiatric Refugees, 1930-1950 - Paul Weindling

Selected Bibliography

List of Contributors

Index