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Dieter Klöcker, Consortium Classicum, Iona Brown, The Academy of St. Martin-in-the-Fields - Symphonies Concertantes (2004)

Posted By: ArlegZ
Dieter Klöcker, Consortium Classicum, Iona Brown, The Academy of St. Martin-in-the-Fields - Symphonies Concertantes (2004)

Dieter Klöcker, Consortium Classicum, Iona Brown, The Academy of St. Martin-in-the-Fields - Symphonies Concertantes (2004)
EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue & Log) ~ 966 Mb | Total time: 216:03 | Scans included
Classical | Label: CPO | # 777 009-2 | Recorded: 1977

This collection of ten Classical symphonies concertantes was recorded (quadraphonically!) in 1977 and issued as a five-record set by EMI Electrola. Now it has been licensed by CPO and reissued economically on just three CDs.

Elinor Frey, Lorenzo Ghielmi - Berlin Sonatas: Abel, J.C.F. Bach, C.P.E. Bach, Benda, Kirnberger, C.H. Graun (2015)

Posted By: ArlegZ
Elinor Frey, Lorenzo Ghielmi - Berlin Sonatas: Abel, J.C.F. Bach, C.P.E. Bach, Benda, Kirnberger, C.H. Graun (2015)

Elinor Frey, Lorenzo Ghielmi - Berlin Sonatas: Abel, J.C.F. Bach, C.P.E. Bach, Benda, Kirnberger, C.H. Graun (2015)
EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue & Log) ~ 376 Mb | Total time: 74:04 | Scans included
Classical | Label: Passacaille | PAS 1006 | Recorded: 2014

Today, the five-string cello is treated as an exotic and rarely-played cousin of the standard cello. However, in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries it was simply one of the many instruments used in the family of bass violins, and was particularly important for virtuosic sonatas and solos.

Thomas Fritzsch, Werner Matzke, Michael Schönheit - Carl Friedrich Abel: 2nd Pembroke Collection (2014)

Posted By: ArlegZ
Thomas Fritzsch, Werner Matzke, Michael Schönheit - Carl Friedrich Abel: 2nd Pembroke Collection (2014)

Thomas Fritzsch, Werner Matzke, Michael Schönheit - Carl Friedrich Abel: 2nd Pembroke Collection (2014)
EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue & Log) ~ 672 Mb | Total time: 55:33+60:11 | Scans included
Classical | Label: Coviello Classics | COV91411 | Recorded: 2014

The recently rediscovered, so-called Pembroke collection owned by the Abel-pupil Lady Elizabeth Herbert, Countess of Pembroke and Montgomery (1737-1831), contains 14 previously unknown viol works (ten sonatas and four duos for viola da gamba and cello) by Carl Friedrich Abel (1723-87), which he composed for himself and his talented pupil. Specifically, these expressive pieces are late works that show Abel’s special way of playing. For Coviello, viola da gambist Thomas Fritzsch presents the world premiere recording of these musical jewels.

Brigitte Haudebourg, Philippe Foulon - J.C.F. Bach, Abel, Binder: Sonatas (2004)

Posted By: ArlegZ
Brigitte Haudebourg, Philippe Foulon - J.C.F. Bach, Abel, Binder: Sonatas (2004)

Brigitte Haudebourg, Philippe Foulon - J.C.F. Bach, Abel, Binder: Sonatas (2004)
EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue & Log) ~ 281 Mb | Total time: 62:55 | Scans included
Classical | Label: Arion | # ARN 68645 | Recorded: 2004

These attractive Classical works are played on a reconstructed cello-like instrument with five strings and twelve sympathetic strings which produces a silvery, delicate sound somewhat like the baryton.

Il Gardellino - Carl Friedrich Abel & Johann Christian Bach: Chamber Music (2010)

Posted By: ArlegZ
Il Gardellino - Carl Friedrich Abel & Johann Christian Bach: Chamber Music (2010)

Il Gardellino - Carl Friedrich Abel & Johann Christian Bach: Chamber Music (2010)
EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue & Log) ~ 346 Mb | Total time: 62:30 | Scans included
Classical | Label: Accent | # ACC 24221 | Recorded: 2009

In 1764 a couple of German musicians lodged together in London. They shared a sort of common background, for one was the youngest son of Johann Sebastian Bach, newly arrived in town to write opera, and the other, Carl Friedrich Abel, had been Bach’s student back in Leipzig more than a decade earlier. He was in town to make his living as a composer of instrumental works and as a performer on that now-anachronistic instrument the viola da gamba. The two apparently hit it off quite well, for they soon conspired to develop the famed Bach-Abel concert series that became a fixture in the city for more than a decade and a half. Given that they also contrived to perform as well, it is not surprising that both men created a wide variety of works for their instruments, Bach on the keyboard and Abel on his gamba. Given that the latter was hardly fit to compete against larger ensembles, it of necessity was confined to smaller chamber works, which were often published for general consumption among musical cognoscenti. These concerts lasted up to Bach’s death in 1782 and a tad beyond, although both leaders had gone their own separate ways some time before and the series was in decline.