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Robert Woolley - Jan Pieterszoon Sweelinck: Works for Keyboard, Volume 2 (2009)

Posted By: Designol
Robert Woolley - Jan Pieterszoon Sweelinck: Works for Keyboard, Volume 2 (2009)

Robert Woolley - Jan Pieterszoon Sweelinck: Works for Keyboard, Vol. 2 (2009)
EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue&Log) ~ 389 Mb | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 149 Mb | Artwork included
Classical, Renaissance/Baroque | Label: Chandos Chaconne | # CHAN0758 | Time: 01:03:41

As well as being one of the most famous organists and teachers of his time, Sweelinck was the last and most important composer of the musically rich golden era of the Netherlanders. His output comprises seventy works for keyboard, which represent some of the most richly imaginative music of the period, yet none was published during his lifetime. Robert Woolley has a large discography on Chandos, both as a soloist and as a member of The Purcell Quartet, the ensemble he co-founded in 1983. An internationally regarded authority on the music of this period, he broadcasts regularly for the BBC and has performed and recorded on many historic instruments. On this recording, he plays two instruments: a modern copy by Malcolm Rose of the Lodewijk Theewes claviorgan of 1579, a harpsichord-organ combination which has belonged to the Victoria and Albert Museum, London since 1890; and a rarely heard virginal, or muselar, by the firm Adlam Burnett, based on an instrument of Ioannes Ruckers from 1611 in the Finchcocks collection.

Robert Woolley - Jan Pieterszoon Sweelinck: Organ Works (2003)

Posted By: Designol
Robert Woolley - Jan Pieterszoon Sweelinck: Organ Works (2003)

Robert Woolley - Jan Pieterszoon Sweelinck: Organ Works (2003)
EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue&Log) ~ 327 Mb | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 170 Mb | Artwork included
Genre: Classical | Label: Chandos Chaconne | # CHAN 0701 | Time: 01:13:27

The late-Renaissance keyboard music of Jan Pieterszoon Sweelinck is virtuosic to a high degree, reflecting both his exceptional skills as an improviser and the secular role organ music was assigned in Reformed Amsterdam. Without a liturgical function to constrain his imagination or shape his music – Calvinist services had no place for it – Sweelinck was free to provide fanciful showpieces for his daily recitals in the Oude Kerk. Examples of his improvisational style can be found in the quasi-fugal Hexachord Fantasia, the witty Echo Fantasia, and the flamboyant Toccatas, of which three are included here. Yet Sweelinck's music is also rigorously logical and full of ingenious contrapuntal devices. These are readily found in his fantasias, but are prominently featured in his numerous sets of variations. His elaborate settings of the chorales Allein Gott in der Höh sei Ehr and Erbarm dich mein, o Herre Gott, and his variations on popular melodies, such as the famous Mein junges Leben hat ein End, display his invention and thorough manipulation of his subjects in all registers. Perhaps better known as a harpsichordist, Robert Woolley is also a fine organist. Woolley has selected representative works from each of Sweelinck's favored genres and given them exceptional performances on the Van Hagerbeer organ of the Pieterskerk, Leiden.