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Corydon Singers, Matthew Best - Johannes Brahms: Motets (1989) Reissue 2010

Posted By: Designol
Corydon Singers, Matthew Best - Johannes Brahms: Motets (1989) Reissue 2010

Corydon Singers, Matthew Best - Johannes Brahms: Motets (1989) Reissue 2010
EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue&Log) ~ 270 Mb | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 163 Mb | Artwork included
Classical, Choral | Label: Hyperion/Helios | # CDH55346 | Time: 01:08:40

This fabulous recording featuring Matthew Best and the Corydon Singers was first released in 1989 at a time when they were recording the standard repertoire for small choirs for Hyperion, and this disc of Brahms' motets and shorter sacred choral pieces was, and is, one of their finest. From the smooth and lovely Ave Maria for women's choir and organ through their hard and harsh "Warum is das Licht gegeben?" to their craggy yet consoling "Wenn wir in höchsten Nöten sein," Best and his choir deliver technically impeccable and deeply moving performances. The Corydon Singers tend toward a big, lush, and slightly fruity sound, as is common with English choirs. But one cannot fault their diction, articulation, pronunciation or their tone, blend, and balance. Best's interpretations are soulful but not sentimental and expressive but not excessive. Recorded in full-bodied digital sound, these performances will likely please fans of Brahms' sacred choral music.

Matthew Best, English Chamber Orchestra, Corydon Singers - Bruckner: Requiem in D minor (1987)

Posted By: ArlegZ
Matthew Best, English Chamber Orchestra, Corydon Singers - Bruckner: Requiem in D minor (1987)

Matthew Best, English Chamber Orchestra, Corydon Singers - Bruckner: Requiem in D minor (1987)
EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue & Log) ~ 241 Mb | Total time: 55:41 | Scans included
Classical | Label: Hyperion | CDA66245 | Recorded: 1987

Bruckner’s early Requiem of 1849 and the setting of Psalm 114 (really 116) were composed well before his long period of gruelling technical study with Simon Sechter, during which period he was permitted to compose almost nothing. That was followed by another stretch with Otto Kitzler, less prohibitive so far as creative work was concerned, but still severe; at this time he wrote the Overture in G minor, the ‘study’ symphony in F minor, and a number of choral pieces, including the substantial Psalm 112 (with orchestra) on this record. This period of deliberate creative abstinence has led to the belief that Bruckner was a late starter, that he wrote no music of worth before he was about forty.