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Andras Schiff, Budapest FO, Heinz Holliger - Sandor Veress: Hommage a Paul Klee; Concerto; 6 Csardas (1998)

Posted By: Designol
Andras Schiff, Budapest FO, Heinz Holliger - Sandor Veress: Hommage a Paul Klee; Concerto; 6 Csardas (1998)

Sándor Veress: Hommage à Paul Klee;
Concerto for Piano, Strings & Percussion; 6 Csárdás (1998)
András Schiff, piano; Dénas Várjon, piano; Gábor Takács-Nagy, violin
Budapest Festival Orchestra; Heinz Holliger, conductor

EAC | FLAC | Tracks (Cue&Log) ~ 267 Mb | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 145 Mb | Scans ~ 135 Mb
Classical | Label: Teldec Classics | # 0630-19992-2 | Time: 01:03:22

A countryman of Bela Bartók and a sometime teacher to both György Ligeti and György Kurtág, Sándor Veress emigrated to Switzerland from what was then part of Hungary in 1949. Settling in Bern, he collected various prizes and teaching posts while working in relative obscurity on who knows how many pieces–most of which have been unavailable. This collection is made up of a pithy trio of compositions dated 1938 (Six Csárdás), 1951 (Hommage à Paul Klee), and 1952 (Concerto for Piano, Strings, and Percussion), and they show what a deftly melodic force Veress was. He's thrilled by blustery string wafts, especially in the concerto, where the percussion adds drama and immediacy. But he also favors sweetly chipper string formations, which surprise the ear during the homage to Klee, especially given the dissonances fostered early on by the twin pianos. The closing piano miniatures of Six Csárdás are counterpoint-rich gems, played with sharp precision by András Schiff.

Akiko Suwanai, Ivan Fischer, BFO - Dvorak: Violin Concerto, Mazurek; Sarasate: Zigeunerweisen, Carmen Fantasy (2001)

Posted By: Designol
Akiko Suwanai, Ivan Fischer, BFO - Dvorak: Violin Concerto, Mazurek; Sarasate: Zigeunerweisen, Carmen Fantasy (2001)

Antonín Dvořák: Violin Concerto; Mazurek, Op.49
Pablo de Sarasate: Zigeunerweisen; Carmen Fantasy (2001)
Akiko Suwanai, violin; Budapest Festival Orchestra, conducted by Iván Fischer

EAC | FLAC | Tracks (Cue&Log) ~ 252 Mb | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 147 Mb | Scans included
Genre: Classical | Label: Philips Classics | # 464 531-2 | Time: 00:55:27

Dvorák’s Violin Concerto has been undergoing a renaissance of sorts on disc, one that it entirely deserves. Its critics (starting with Joachim and Brahms) dismissed it for not adopting the usual sonata-form first movement structure, instead welding the truncated opening to the gorgeous slow movement. But really, how many violin concertos are there where you can really say that the best, most characterful and highly developed movement is the finale? And what could possibly be bad about that? Clearly Fischer and Suwanai understand where the music’s going: the performance gathers steam as it proceeds, and really cuts loose in that marvelous last movement. Suwani displays a characteristically polished technique and fine intonational ear (lending a lovely purity of utterance to the slow movement), but she’s not afraid to indulge in some “down and dirty” gypsy fiddling in the finale, or in the two Sarasate items that open the program.

Thomas Zehetmair, Budapest FO, Ivan Fischer - Bela Bartok: Violin Concertos Nos. 1 & 2 (1995)

Posted By: Designol
Thomas Zehetmair, Budapest FO, Ivan Fischer - Bela Bartok: Violin Concertos Nos. 1 & 2 (1995)

Béla Bartók: Violin Concertos Nos. 1 & 2 (1995)
Thomas Zehetmair, violin; Budapest Festival Orchestra; Iván Fischer, conductor

EAC | FLAC | Tracks (Cue&Log) ~ 245 Mb | Scans ~ 64 Mb | Time: 00:56:58
Genre: Classical | Label: Berlin Classics/Edel | # 0115292

Neither too nationalist nor too internationalist, this 1995 recording of Béla Bartók's two violin concertos featuring Thomas Zehetmair with Ivan Fischer leading the Budapest Festival Orchestra is just right. Austrian-born Zehetmair has a fabulous technique, a warm but focused tone, and lively sense of rhythm, all of which make him an ideal Bartók player. His interpretations are less about showing off then about digging in, and his performances are more about the music than they are about the musician. Hungarian conductor Fischer and his Hungarian orchestra are not only up for the music in a technical sense, they are also down with the music in an emotional sense, and their accompaniments ground Zehetmair's coolly flamboyant performances. Captured in white-hot sound that is almost too vivid for its own good, these performances deserve to stand among the finest ever recorded.

Zoltan Kocsis, Budapest FO, Ivan Fischer - Franz Liszt: Piano Concertos; Erno von Dohnanyi: Variations on a Nursery Song (1989)

Posted By: Designol
Zoltan Kocsis, Budapest FO, Ivan Fischer - Franz Liszt: Piano Concertos; Erno von Dohnanyi: Variations on a Nursery Song (1989)

Franz Liszt: Piano Concertos; Ernö von Dohnányi: Variations on a Nursery Song (1989)
Zoltán Kocsis, piano; Budapest Festival Orchestra; Iván Fischer, conductor

EAC | FLAC | Tracks (Cue&Log) ~ 251 Mb | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 163 Mb | Scans included
Genre: Classical | Label: Philips | # 422 380-2 | Time: 01:00:36

So what if Liszt spent most of his life in France and Germany and never learned to speak Hungarian? The music of the Magyars' fiery favorite son played by a hot-blooded local boy is an irresistible combination. Even the delightful Dohnanyi filler (variations on ''Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star'') doesn't really douse the flames. Put it in the CD player and let 'er rip! Just be sure to remove all flammable vestments first. (Entertainment Weekly)

Budapest FO, Ivan Fischer - Zoltan Kodaly: Hary Janos Suite; Dances of Galanta & Marosszek; Children's Choruses (1999)

Posted By: Designol
Budapest FO, Ivan Fischer - Zoltan Kodaly: Hary Janos Suite; Dances of Galanta & Marosszek; Children's Choruses (1999)

Zoltán Kodály: Háry János Suite; Dances of Galánta & Marosszék; Children's Choruses (1999)
Children's Choir Magnificat, Budapest; Children's Choir Miraculum, Kecskemét
Budapest Festival Orchestra, Iván Fischer, conductor

EAC | FLAC | Tracks (Cue&Log) ~ 309 Mb | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 178 Mb | Scans included
Genre: Classical | Label: Philips | # 462 824-2 | Time: 01:06:13

Coupling the Hary Janos Suite with Kodaly ’ s two highly contrasted sets of Hungarian dances, urban and rural, is a time - honoured gambit, but Fischer has had the birght idea of adding some of the composer ’ s children ’ s choruses, and instrumental movements from the seldom - heard Hary Janos Singspiel that was the ultimate source for the perennially popular suite, in order to give a broader picture of Kodaly, both as musician and musical humorist. On the whole it works well: the Singspiel extracts are very slight, but the choruses are highly characteristic – and flawlessly sung by superbly disciplined childrens ’ choirs trained, inevitably, in the ‘ Kodaly Method ’. Nevertheless the three principal orchestral works remain the point for buying the disc, and these are very vivid, exciting interpretations. Fischer comes up against stiff competition in Antal Dorati ’ s classic 1973 recording of Hary and the dance - suites with the Philharmonia Hungarica. Dorati is ‘ straighter ’ in his readings of the pieces than Fischer, and the playing packs a tremendous punch: he also adds the Peacock Variations as coupling, and thus probably still remains the first choice.

Iván Fischer - Gustav Mahler: Das Lied von der Erde (2020)

Posted By: delpotro
Iván Fischer - Gustav Mahler: Das Lied von der Erde (2020)

Iván Fischer, Budapest Festival Orchestra, Iván Fischer, Gerhild Romberger & Robert Dean Smith - Gustav Mahler: Das Lied von der Erde (2020)
WEB FLAC (tracks) - 218 Mb | MP3 CBR 320 kbps - 143 Mb | Digital booklet | 01:01:25
Classical, Vocal | Label: Channel Classics Records

From the symphony to the song would seem to be an enormous step: from the largest form for the largest orchestra to the smallest form for the smallest ensemble. Gustav Mahler nonetheless brought them together and interwove them in previous symphonies as well as in ‘Das Lied von der Erde’. "The long, endlessly stretched crescendo on the single note "e" (filled with so much desire) leads to the final part of Abschied, which I can only describe with the word ‘cosmic’. The voice is surrounded by floating meteors, objects, particles or stars, which move in various directions and speeds. We have left the atmosphere and look back on the beautiful green and blue planet." - Iván Fischer, conductor

Andras Schiff, Ivan Fischer, Budapest Festival Orchestra - Bela Bartok: Piano Concertos Nos. 1-3 (1996)

Posted By: Designol
Andras Schiff, Ivan Fischer, Budapest Festival Orchestra - Bela Bartok: Piano Concertos Nos. 1-3 (1996)

Béla Bartók - Piano Concertos Nos. 1-3 (1996)
András Schiff, piano; Budapest Festival Orchestra, conducted by Iván Fischer

EAC | FLAC | Tracks (Cue&Log) ~ 328 Mb | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 196 Mb | Scans included
Genre: Classical | Label: Teldec Classics | # 0630-13158-2 | Time: 01:16:26

First there was rhythm - pulsing, driving, primal rhythm. And a new word in musical terminology: Barbaro. As with sticks on skins, so with hammers on strings. The piano as one of the percussion family, the piano among the percussion family. The first and second concertos were written to be performed that way. But the rhythm had shape and direction, myriad accents, myriad subtleties. An informed primitivism. A Baroque primitivism. Then came the folkloric inflections chipped from the music of time: the crude and misshapen suddenly finding a singing voice. Like the simple melody - perhaps a childhood recollection - that emerges from the dogged rhythm of the First Concerto's second movement. András Schiff plays it like a defining moment - the piano reinvented as a singing instrument. His "parlando" (conversational) style is very much in Bartók's own image. But it's the balance here between the honed and unhoned, the brawn and beauty, the elegance and wit of this astonishing music that make these readings special.