Subcategories
Tags
Language
Tags

Geoffrey Tozer, LPO, Neeme Jarvi - Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky: Piano Concerto No.3; Symphony No.7 (1993)

Posted By: Designol
Geoffrey Tozer, LPO, Neeme Jarvi - Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky: Piano Concerto No.3; Symphony No.7 (1993)

Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky: Piano Concerto No.3; Symphony No.7 (1993)
Geoffrey Tozer, piano; The London Philharmonic; Neeme Järvi, conductor

EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue&Log) ~ 255 Mb | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 137 Mb | Scans included
Genre: Classical | Label: Chandos | # CHAN 9130 | Time: 00:57:22

The Tchaikovsky Piano Concerto No. 3 is rarely heard, though it is a finely crafted work worth greater attention. It has suffered alongside the magnificent and superior Second and the ever-popular First. Moreover, it is not a bona fide concerto at all, the composer having completed only the first movement before his sudden death in 1893. Contrary to the suggestion of a few, it is highly unlikely he intended to produce a one-movement concerto. Tchaikovsky wrote two other piano pieces the same year bearing the titles "Andante" and "Finale," respectively. Following his death, Taneyev orchestrated these and attached them to the Concerto, though Tchaikovsky had left no indication they were to be a part of it. But the pair did share something in common with the completed first movement: a theme source – the incomplete Symphony No. 7. In any event, the opening movement of this Concerto is the most compelling, featuring an exuberant main theme whose first two notes are the central melodic element. An attractive slow melody is soon presented, followed by a theme of great vivacity and rhythmic drive.

Geoffrey Tozer, BBC Philharmonic, Sir Edward Downes - Respighi: Belfagor Overture; Toccata; Tre Corali; Fantasia slava (1994)

Posted By: Designol
Geoffrey Tozer, BBC Philharmonic, Sir Edward Downes - Respighi: Belfagor Overture; Toccata; Tre Corali; Fantasia slava (1994)

Ottorino Respighi: Belfagor Overture; Toccata; Tre Corali; Fantasia slava (1994)
Geoffrey Tozer, piano; BBC Philharmonic; Sir Edward Downes, conductor

EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue&Log) ~ 197 Mb | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 142 Mb | Artwork included
Genre: Classical | Label: Chandos | # CHAN 9311 | Time: 00:59:49

Respighi’s colourful music could have been written with the clear, full-bodied Chandos sound in mind. Following on from where Geoffrey Simon began for the label in the Eighties, Edward Downes is now exploring the more symphonic side of Respighi’s output, showing there is more to him than the Roman trilogy (if not that much, qualitatively). The present disc includes two of his four concertante works for piano and orchestra, the extended Toccata (according to Tozer’s booklet note, the longest such work in existence) and the quirky Slavonic Rhapsody, with its humorous sideswipe at Dvorák. More characteristic of Respighi is the concert overture derived from his opera Belfagor, about the exploits of a Till Eulenspiegel/Don Juan figure, portrayed with suitably colourful sound-painting. All these, together with the Bachian Three Chorales, are played with marvellous verve and commitment – the BBC PO under Downes has a way with this out-of-the-way repertoire that few can equal. The sound quality on this disc is nothing short of stunning.

Geoffrey Tozer, BBC SO, Matthias Bamert - Roberto Gerhard: Symphony No.3; Epithalamion; Piano Concerto (1997)

Posted By: Designol
Geoffrey Tozer, BBC SO, Matthias Bamert - Roberto Gerhard: Symphony No.3; Epithalamion; Piano Concerto (1997)

Roberto Gerhard: Symphony No.3; Epithalamion; Piano Concerto (1997)
Geoffrey Tozer, piano; BBC Symphony Orchestra; Matthias Bamert, conductor

EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue&Log) ~ 260 Mb | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 157 Mb | Artwork included
Genre: Classical | Label: Chandos | # CHAN 9556 | Time: 01:05:09

At a time when Schoenberg and Stravinsky were thought of as opposite poles, Roberto Gerhard was combining the density of the one with the dynamism of the other in a wholly personal synthesis. You can hear this in the Piano Concerto's mood swings from the dark and brooding to, in the finale, a Spanish take-off that Chabrier would have thought off the wall. Gerhard's 1960s music is in-your-face modernism that holds you in its grasp, embracing sound with an enthusiasm that remains inspirational today. Listen to the tape part of the Third Symphony–a cut-and-paste job that trounces most of the computer-music generation in its imagination and feeling for what's possible. Epithalamion features material originally intended for, of all things, Lindsay Anderson's film This Sporting Life. Not that its impact is any less than coherent; the percussion writing alone has a fantasy that will keep you entranced. Well prepared performances, superbly recorded. This is still music of the future.