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Johnny Clegg & Savuka - Heat, Dust & Dreams (1993)

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Johnny Clegg & Savuka - Heat, Dust & Dreams (1993)

Johnny Clegg & Savuka - Heat, Dust & Dreams (1993)
EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue&Log) ~ 347 Mb | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 117 Mb
Label: EMI | # 0777 7 98795 2 6 | Time: 00:50:48 | Scans ~ 113 Mb
World Fusion, World Beat, Afro Pop, Mbaqanga, Folk Rock, Pop/Rock

Heat, Dust And Dreams is a studio album by South African artist Johnny Clegg and his band Savuka, released in 1993, produced by Hilton Rosenthal, co-produced by Bobby Summerfield. The album received a 1993 Grammy Award nomination for Best World Music Album. The album would be the final work of the band Savuka. It was made in honor of member Dudu Zulu, who had been assassinated in the last years of the apartheid. Most songs of album are heavily influenced by the end of this dark period of South African history. "These Days", "When the System has Fallen", "In My African Dream" and "Your Time Will Come" all express hope for the future, while songs like "The Promise" and "Foreign Nights" talk of the problems people still have to face. "Emotional Allegiance" turns the attention to the Indian influence featuring Ashish Joshi on Tablas. It is the only Savuka album to receive the same degree of critical acclaim as the Juluka albums such as Universal Men, African Litany, Work for All and Scatterlings.

VA - The Indestructible Beat of Soweto (1985) Reissue 1989

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VA - The Indestructible Beat of Soweto (1985) Reissue 1989

VA - The Indestructible Beat of Soweto (1985) Reissue 1989
EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue&Log) ~ 259 Mb | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 113 Mb
Label: Shanachie | # SH 43033 | Time: 00:45:51 | Scans included
Genre: South African Traditions, Afro-Pop, Mbaqanga

The Indestructible Beat of Soweto is a compilation album released in 1985 on the Earthworks label, featuring musicians from South Africa, including Ladysmith Black Mambazo and Mahlathini. The album was placed in the top 10 in the annual Pazz & Jop poll in the magazine The Village Voice. AllMusic calls it "an essential sampler of modern African styling, a revelation and a joy." Leading critic Robert Christgau gave it an A+ rating, and called it the most important record of the 1980s. It was ranked number 388 in Rolling Stone's 500 Greatest Albums of All Time list.