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Peter Neumann, Kolner Kammerchor, Collegium Cartusianum - Handel: Brockes-Passion, HWV 48 (2010)

Posted By: ArlegZ
Peter Neumann, Kolner Kammerchor, Collegium Cartusianum - Handel: Brockes-Passion, HWV 48 (2010)

Peter Neumann, Kölner Kammerchor, Collegium Cartusianum - Handel: Brockes-Passion, HWV 48 (2010)
EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue & Log) ~ 707 Mb | Total time: 78:25+74:58 | Scans included
Classical | Label: Carus | # CARUS83428 | Recorded: 2009

Barthold Heinrich Brockes’ text for the passion oratorio, later named after him, is among the best-known Passion librettos of the early 18th century. This version is the first recording on CD of the work based on the copy made by J S Bach himself. It is distinguished from the better-known version by a different text for the opening chorus.

Peter Neumann, Kolner Kammerchor, Collegium Cartusianum - Mozart: Masses [5CDs] (2000)

Posted By: ArlegZ
Peter Neumann, Kolner Kammerchor, Collegium Cartusianum - Mozart: Masses [5CDs] (2000)

Peter Neumann, Kölner Kammerchor, Collegium Cartusianum - Mozart: Masses [5CDs] (2000)
EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue & Log) ~ 1.48 Gb | Total time: 5:43:44 | Scans included
Classical | Label: Virgin Classics | # 5 61769 2 | Recorded: 1988, 1990

As for the Masses, Mozart kept to the traditional plan in six sections (Kyrie, Gloria, Credo, Sanctus, Benedictus, Agnus Dei), even when the inpression is that the sections are more numerous (as many as 21 in the "Orphanage" Mass), it is actually a matter of sub-sections, of varying number according to the requirements of the particular work, including famous and impressive settings of the 'Laudamus te' and 'Et incarnatus est'.

Peter Neumann, Collegium Cartusianum, Kölner Kammerchor - J.S. Bach: Passio secundum Johannem BWV 245 Version II (1725) (2000)

Posted By: ArlegZ
Peter Neumann, Collegium Cartusianum, Kölner Kammerchor - J.S. Bach: Passio secundum Johannem BWV 245 Version II (1725) (2000)

Peter Neumann, Collegium Cartusianum, Kölner Kammerchor - Johann Sebastian Bach: Passio secundum Johannem BWV 245 Version II (1725) (2000)
EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue & Log) ~ 508 Mb | Total time: 114:21 | Scans included
Classical | Label: MDG | # 332 0983-2 | Recorded: 1999

Peter Neumann ist der erste, dessen Aufnahme die zweite Fassung der ›Johannes-Passion‹ in einem Durchlauf hören läßt. Dies ist insofern wichtig, als durch die Änderungen die Aspekte ›Schuld‹ und ›Sünde‹ stärker akzentuiert werden, die theologische Aussage des Werks also in eine etwas andere Richtung weist. Das eigentlich Bemerkenswerte der vorliegenden Einspielung ist der Einsatz einer großen Kirchenorgel als Continuoinstrument, was den Arien und Chorälen eine ganz eigene Färbung verleiht.

Peter Neumann, Collegium Cartusianum, Kolner Kammerchor - Handel: Joshua (2008)

Posted By: ArlegZ
Peter Neumann, Collegium Cartusianum,  Kolner Kammerchor - Handel: Joshua (2008)

Peter Neumann, Collegium Cartusianum, Kölner Kammerchor - Handel: Joshua (2008)
EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue & Log) ~ 539 Mb | Total time: 49:36+73:04 | Scans included
Classical | Label: MDG | # 332 1532-2 | Recorded: 2007

Joshua is not one of Handel’s great oratorios. Although it is patterned on the previous year’s Judas Maccabaeus with a perfunctory love story tacked on, Morrell’s mediocre libretto did not inspire Handel to the heights of their earlier collaboration. But there are some very good things in Joshua , and second-rate Handel is better than music from some composers’ top drawer, so Joshua is worthy of the occasional performance and recording.

Peter Neumann, Collegium Cartusianum, Kolner Kammerchor - Handel: Athalia (2004)

Posted By: ArlegZ
Peter Neumann, Collegium Cartusianum, Kolner Kammerchor - Handel: Athalia (2004)

Peter Neumann, Collegium Cartusianum, Kölner Kammerchor - Handel: Athalia (2004)
EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue & Log) ~ 556 Mb | Total time: 56:49+65:55 | Scans included
Classical | Label: MDG | # 332 1276-2 | Recorded: 2003

This is the third English Oratorio by Handel, composed in 1733 for the graduation ceremony at Oxford. It is in 3 acts to a libretto by Samuel Humphreys after the stage drama Athalie by Jean Racine. Incidentally, this was Racine's last tragedy penned in 1691. This biblical account taken from Kings 2, centres on the theme of the triumph of God through the revenge performed by his followers on those who blaspheme and oppose him.

Peter Neumann, Collegium Cartusianum, Kolner Kammerchor - Handel: Theodora (2000)

Posted By: ArlegZ
Peter Neumann, Collegium Cartusianum, Kolner Kammerchor - Handel: Theodora (2000)

Peter Neumann, Collegium Cartusianum, Kölner Kammerchor - Handel: Theodora (2000)
EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue & Log) ~ 664 Mb | Total time: 63:35+51:40+40:51 | Scans included
Classical | Label: MDG | # 332 1019-2 | Recorded: 2000

Written in the summer of 1749, Theodora was premiered in London at Covent Garden Theatre on 16 March 1750. This work, which Handel considered his finest oratorio, was a failure at first - Handel said bitterly that the hall was so empty that "there was room enough to dance there." Part of this failure could be explained by the earthquake that hit London in February of the same year and caused the upper classes to flee the city, but another possibility is that the subject matter of the oratorio - the rebellion of a woman against the power of the state - was a bit ahead of its time.

Peter Neumann, Collegium Cartusianum, Kolner Kammerchor - Handel: Susanna (1999)

Posted By: ArlegZ
Peter Neumann, Collegium Cartusianum, Kolner Kammerchor - Handel: Susanna (1999)

Peter Neumann, Collegium Cartusianum, Kölner Kammerchor - Handel: Susanna (1999)
EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue & Log) ~ 677 Mb | Total time: 60:06+51:39+46:03 | Scans included
Classical | Label: MDG | # 332 0945-2 | Recorded: 1999

The story of the innocent Susanna–whose nude bathing in a stream so excited two elders in her community that they charged her with all sorts of dirty things–is from the Apocrypha. Near the story's close, the young Israelite Daniel, clearly a budding lawyer, disproves the elders' claims by having each explain certain details without the other in the room. (In the Carlisle Floyd version, there's a twist, and the ending is horrifyingly different.) The story, as Handel and his unknown librettist tell it, takes more than two and a half hours. What we get in place of nail-biting drama is a marvelous portrait of the chaste Susanna, her trusting husband, Joacim, and the lascivious elders. There's also a great concentration on the plot's rural setting. Arias are filled with nature–Handel offers us a lovely pastoral setting, with a could-be-tragic story at its core; but neither Nature nor Susanna's good nature wind up sullied. This is a beautiful performance of the work, led by Peter Neumann with tenderness and, when required, with great verve. Neumann makes only a few cuts, equaling about 10 minutes and approved by Handel for the work's 1759 revival.
(Robert Levine)