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Fenwick Smith, Sally Pinkas, John Ferrillo, Thomas Martin - Bohuslav Martinu: Chamber Music with Flute (2010)

Posted By: Designol
Fenwick Smith, Sally Pinkas, John Ferrillo, Thomas Martin - Bohuslav Martinu: Chamber Music with Flute (2010)

Bohuslav Martinů - Chamber Music with Flute (2010)
Fenwick Smith, flute; Sally Pinkas, piano; John Ferrillo, oboe; Thomas Martin, clarinet
Richard Ranti & Suzanne Nelson, bassoons; Haldan Martinson, violin; Rhonda Ryder, cello

EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue&Log) ~ 312 Mb | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 158 Mb | Scans included
Genre: Classical | Label: Naxos | # 8.572467 | Time: 01:08:48

After the death of Janáček in 1924, Martinů assumed the mantle of the leading Czech composer of the twentieth century. The chamber music on this disc abounds with the mosaic-like patterns, translucent lyricism and infectious rhythmic vitality which give his works their kaleidoscopic quality. From the highly original Sextet of 1929, with its jazzy Parisian character, to the Flute Sonata of 1945, in which the much-travelled composer imitates the song of the whippoorwill, an indigenous bird of New England, this disc surveys a quarter-century of Martinů’s prolific and always inventive output.

Ivan Klansky, Kocian Quartet - Bohuslav Martinu: Piano Quintets H229, 298; Piano Quartet H287 (2009)

Posted By: Designol
Ivan Klansky, Kocian Quartet - Bohuslav Martinu: Piano Quintets H229, 298; Piano Quartet H287 (2009)

Bohuslav Martinů: Piano Quintets H229, 298; Piano Quartet H287 (2009)
Ivan Klánský, piano; Kocian Quartet

EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue&Log) ~ 339 Mb | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 171 Mb | Scans included
Genre: Classical | Label: PRD/DSD 250250 | # Praga Digitals | Time: 01:12:05

The composer of Julietta left an abundant harvest of chamber works, a jazzy, iconoclastic piano quintet, then two masterpieces from the American period, preliminary counterpoints to the Symphonies of 1942 and 1944, still marked by the anguish of war.Three masterpieces brought together on a single disc for the first time by the Kocians and Ivan Klansky.

Jenny Lin - Chinoiserie (2000)

Posted By: Designol
Jenny Lin - Chinoiserie (2000)

Jenny Lin - Chinoiserie (2000)
Works by Rossini, Chasins, Grainger, Arensky, Tcherepnin, Busoni,
Gould, Adams, Ornstein, Jacqueline Waeber-Diaz, Scott, Martinů

EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue&Log) ~ 267 Mb | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 194 Mb | Scans included
Genre: Classical | Label: BIS | # BIS-CD-1110 | Time: 01:19:43

In BIS' Chinoiserie, pianist Jenny Lin brings one of the most compelling and relevant themed recitals to be heard on disc in years, a collection of pieces by Western composers that attempts to explore the subject of China in some regard, not only musically but culturally.

Sol Gabetta, Berliner Philharmoniker - Live: Edward Elgar & Bohuslav Martinu: Cello Concertos (2016)

Posted By: Designol
Sol Gabetta, Berliner Philharmoniker - Live: Edward Elgar & Bohuslav Martinu: Cello Concertos (2016)

Sol Gabetta - Live: Edward Elgar & Bohuslav Martinů: Cello Concertos (2016)
with Berliner Philharmoniker, conducted by Sir Simon Rattle & Krzysztof Urbański

EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue&Log) ~ 242 Mb | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 134 Mb | Scans included
Genre: Classical | Label: Sony Classical | # 88985350792 | Time: 00:55:45

Sol Gabetta’s first recording of the Elgar Cello Concerto, with the Danish National Symphony, was much admired when it appeared six years ago. This one, taken from a concert in the Baden-Baden Festspielhaus in 2014, is a far glossier affair orchestrally. Simon Rattle’s tendency to overmould the phrasing is sometimes too obvious, but Gabetta’s playing is intense and searching, less introspective than some performances in the Adagio, perhaps, but epic in scale in the outer movements, and always keenly responsive. Those who possess her earlier disc might not think they need to invest in this one, but would then miss Gabetta’s vivid, pulsating account of the Martinů concerto, which went through a quarter of a century of revisions before the definitive 1955 version she plays here, with Krysztof Urbański conducting. She finds real depth and intensity in it, both in the slow movement and in the introspective episode that interrupts the finale’s headlong rush.