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John Eliot Gardiner, The Monteverdi Choir, The Philip Jones Brass Ensemble - Christmas in Venice (1992)

Posted By: ArlegZ
John Eliot Gardiner, The Monteverdi Choir, The Philip Jones Brass Ensemble - Christmas in Venice (1992)

John Eliot Gardiner, The Monteverdi Choir, The Philip Jones Brass Ensemble - Christmas in Venice: Gabrieli, Bassano, Monteverdi (1992)
EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue & Log) ~ 306 Mb | Total time: 67:47 | Scans included
Classical | Label: Decca | 436 285-2 | Recorded: 1972

There is some grand and characteristically sumptuous music on this record of motets and instrumental pieces that might have been heard during the feast of Christmas in St Mark's or one of the other great churches of Venice round about 1600 or a little later. A strong point in its favour, too, is the unhackneyed choice of programme: the instrumental Sonata pian' e forte, of course, is an old favourite, and the two earlier double-choir motets of Gabrieli, Angelus ad pastores and 0 magnum mysterium, are also relatively familiar; but the three remaining Gabrieli motets, all taken from posthumous publications and among his most elaborate polychoral pieces, are much less often tackled—not surprisingly, since they call for exceptional resources.

Étienne Meyer, Les Traversées Baroques - San Marco di Venezia: The Golden Age (2018)

Posted By: ArlegZ
Étienne Meyer, Les Traversées Baroques - San Marco di Venezia: The Golden Age (2018)

Étienne Meyer, Les Traversées Baroques - San Marco di Venezia: The Golden Age (2018)
EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue & Log) ~ 338 Mb | Total time: 72:28 | Scans included
Classical | Label: Pan Classics | ACC 24345 | Recorded: 2017

It is well known that in Venice a "Golden Age" of compositional, vocal, and instrumental musical creativity and virtuosity emerged, and then flourished during the mid-1500s to the mid-1700s. The 16th century experienced a substantial development in the cappella ducale of Saint Mark's, which, until the end of the 17th century, remained the leading center of musical activity in the city. Evidence of this comes from the profusion of significant musicians that it received in that "Golden Age": either as maestri di cappella, or as organists (Claudio Merulo, Andrea and Giovanni Gabrieli), or as virtuoso instrumentalists (the cornet player Giovanni Bassano). Claudio Merulo and Andrea Gabrieli played a decisive role in the simultaneous emergence of Venetian keyboard and stile concertato music.