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Richard Bonynge, Joan Sutherland, Horst Stein, Josef Sivo - Glière: Coloraturo Concerto; Glazunov: Violin Concerto (1990)

Posted By: ArlegZ
Richard Bonynge, Joan Sutherland, Horst Stein, Josef Sivo - Glière: Coloraturo Concerto; Glazunov: Violin Concerto (1990)

Richard Bonynge, Joan Sutherland, Osian Ellis, Horst Stein, Josef Sivo - Glière: Coloraturo Concerto, Harp Concerto; Glazunov: Violin Concerto (1990)
EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue & Log) ~ 293 Mb | Total time: 62:51 | Scans included
Classical | Label: Decca | # 430 006-2 | Recorded: 1968, 1971

Of the rarities presented in this unusual Russian music collection, the most tantalizing is Gliére’s Concerto for Coloratura Soprano and Orchestra. Judging by the slight surface noise, it sounds as if this transfer could have been made from an LP. No matter, the sound is fine, and Joan Sutherland sings radiantly, pouring out beguiling tone throughout her range, while her trademark trills are put to good use by Gliére’s vocal writing, which isn’t particularly original, especially considering it was composed in 1943. The same can be said for Gliére’s 1938 Harp Concerto: beguiling solo writing set against standard-fare 19th-century orchestral accompaniment.

Utrecht String Quartet - Alexander Grechaninov: String Quartets Op. 75 & 124 (2006)

Posted By: Designol
Utrecht String Quartet - Alexander Grechaninov: String Quartets Op. 75 & 124 (2006)

Utrecht String Quartet - Alexander Grechaninov: String Quartets Op. 75 & 124 (2006)
XLD | FLAC | Image (Cue&Log) ~ 339 Mb | Scans included | Time: 01:08:38
Genre: Classical | Label: MDG Scene | # MDG 603 1388-2

Grechaninov was born in Moscow a year before Sibelius and also died in New York a year before Sibelius. He was taught by Rimsky-Korsakov. His music did not migrate far from his roots and continued to write in that style well after the 1917 revolution had led to exile first in France and then in the USA. A prolific composer in all the usual genres, his reputation seems to rest mainly on choral music and to be rather tainted by suggestions of lack of originality. Certainly, by comparison with his near contemporary Sibelius, his style did not develop much, meaning it is rather hard to believe the fourth quartet was written as late as 1929. But, listening to this disc, I sometimes found the music hard to place and was not continually reminded of other composers, surely one sign of an original voice. There are four Grechaninov string quartets and this offering completes the Utrecht Quartet’s cycle. The previous disc was well-received by Michael Cookson three years ago (see review). Both works are in four movements with the slow movement placed second. They are fairly conventional but well-crafted and pleasant listening.

Utrecht String Quartet - Alexander Grechaninov: String Quartets Op. 2 & 70 (2003)

Posted By: Designol
Utrecht String Quartet - Alexander Grechaninov: String Quartets Op. 2 & 70 (2003)

Utrecht String Quartet - Alexander Grechaninov: String Quartets Op. 2 & 70 (2003)
XLD | FLAC | Image (Cue&Log) ~ 278 Mb | Scans included | Time: 00:58:34
Genre: Classical | Label: MDG Scene | # MDG 603 1157-2

Grechaninov tends to be remembered rather tepidly as a conservative relic from Imperial Russia. Yet his progress as a child of the 1860s went as far as one might reasonably expect, from the healthy absorption of 19th-century Russian masters in the Op. 2 Quartet, his self-styled ‘first large independent work’, to the chromatic experimentation of the D minor Quartet, composed in 1913. They make a pretty pair. The warm, slightly laid-back approach of the likeable Utrecht Quartet fits the simple folksiness of the earlier piece like a delicately fashioned glove, making modest claims for a humble offshoot of Borodin’s glorious Second Quartet, with a discreet dash of Tchaikovskian melancholy. A more urgent, forward-moving approach would surely make a better case for the seemingly fragmented gestures of Op. 70’s opening movement; but first violinist Eeva Koskinen’s unaffected way with the Largo melody before fugal earnestness takes over is ideal, and an equally natural robustness highlights Grechaninov’s instinctive if hard-fought goodbye to chromaticism in much the more successful and meaningful of the two finales. Worth investigating, but there’s no doubt that Taneyev is a long way in front of Grechaninov as master of turn-of-the-century Russian chamber music.

Valeri Polyansky, Russian State Symphony Orchestra - Grechaninov: Symphony No. 5, Missa Oecumenica (2000)

Posted By: ArlegZ
Valeri Polyansky, Russian State Symphony Orchestra - Grechaninov: Symphony No. 5, Missa Oecumenica (2000)

Valeri Polyansky, Russian State Symphony Orchestra - Grechaninov: Symphony No. 5, Missa Oecumenica (2000)
EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue & Log) ~ 325 Mb | Total time: 79:16 | Digital booklet
Classical | Label: Chandos | # CHAN 9845 | Recorded: 1999

Polyansky brings plenty of energy and excitement to the faster music…with their refined brass, nicely expressive solo winds, and resplendent strings, Polyansky’s Russian State Symphony is by far the best orchestra to essay this music so far.
–American Record Guide