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Ursula Oppens, Arditti String Quartet - Elliott Carter: Chamber Music (2000) [Re-Up]

Posted By: Designol
Ursula Oppens, Arditti String Quartet - Elliott Carter: Chamber Music (2000) [Re-Up]

Ursula Oppens, Arditti String Quartet - Elliott Carter: Chamber Music (2000)
EAC | FLAC | Tracks (Cue&Log) ~ 303 Mb | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 184 Mb | Scans included
Classical, Contemporary | Label: Montaigne | # MO 782122 | Time: 01:15:58

In his 90th year, Elliott Carter is doing something few nonagenarians ever do: he's premiering a striking new string quartet, his fifth. And it's an awe-inspiring piece. The Arditti String Quartet takes up the short phrases that run with and then against one another with sureness, plucking and scraping and making their bows sing. They then delve into each of the five interludes that interrogate the quartet's six sections and play through the disparate splinters of tone and flushes of midrange color as if they were perfectly logical developments. Which they're not. Carter has again brilliantly scripted a chatter of stringed voices–à la the second quartet–that converse quickly, sometimes mournfully, but never straightforwardly. This complexity of conversation is a constant for Carter, coming sharply to light in "90+" and then in Rohan de Saram and Ursula Oppens's heaving read of the 1948 Sonata for Cello and Piano, as well as in virtually all these pieces. This is a monumental recording, extending the documented work of a lamentably underappreciated American composer.

Arditti String Quartet - Luciano Berio: The String Quartets (2002) [Re-Up]

Posted By: Designol
Arditti String Quartet - Luciano Berio: The String Quartets (2002) [Re-Up]

Arditti String Quartet - Luciano Berio: The String Quartets (2002)
EAC | FLAC | Tracks (Cue&Log) ~ 230 Mb | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 150 Mb | Scans included
Classical, Contemporary | Label: Naïve-Montaigne | # MO 782155 | Time: 01:01:33

After so many benchmark recordings of the music of our time, the members of the Arditti Quartet were bound to give us one day a complete survey of the string quartets of Luciano Berio, the great Commendatore figure who has dominated Italian music since the 1950s. In point of fact, this programme takes in almost the whole career of the composer of Sequenze, from his Quartet no.1 of 1956, still under the influence of serialism, up to the Glosse of 1997 which are, as their title suggests, 'a collection of brief annotations, and at the same time a short dictionary of idiomatic sonic gestures'. In this fully mature work, Berio resolves in magisterial fashion the problem of the search for new instrumental solutions that is characteristic of the fascinating Sincronie (1963-64), an attempt to make the string quartet sound like 'a single homophonic instrument'. The final work in the programme, the Notturno (1993) presents an atmosphere of extreme expressive concentration, in which sound is born of silence (pppp quasi senza suono) and returns there. A whole series of technical and interpretative challenges that the Arditti meet with their usual sovereign mastery.

Arditti String Quartet, Claude Helffer - Iannis Xenakis: Chamber Music 1955-1990 (2003) 2CDs [Re-Up]

Posted By: Designol
Arditti String Quartet, Claude Helffer - Iannis Xenakis: Chamber Music 1955-1990 (2003) 2CDs [Re-Up]

Arditti String Quartet, Claude Helffer - Iannis Xenakis: Chamber Music 1955-1990 (2003) 2CDs
EAC | Tracks (Cue&Log) ~ 642 Mb | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 353 Mb | Scans included
Classical, Avant-Garde | Label: Montaigne/Naive | # MO 782137 | Time: 02:32:14

This ambitious and beautifully produced two-CD set includes nearly all of Iannis Xenakis' chamber music for strings, piano, and strings and piano combined. Chamber music constituted a small part of the composer's output, since large ensembles and large forms were vehicles more commensurate with the aesthetic of his monumental, granitic music. There are no small pieces here, though; in each of these works, ranging from solos to a quintet for piano and strings, Xenakis was able to express his uncompromising vision no less ferociously than in his orchestral works. While all of the pieces have an elemental character, many with a visceral punch, the actual sound of the music is surprisingly varied, and the individual works have distinctive and individual characters. In spite of the weightiness and rigor of the music, the tone is not necessarily heavy, and some pieces, like Evryali for piano and Dikhthas for violin and piano, have moments of what could almost be described as whimsicality.