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Moscow Philharmonic Orchestra - Mussorgsky: The Nursery / Schnittke: In Memoriam (Live) (2017)

Posted By: delpotro
Moscow Philharmonic Orchestra - Mussorgsky: The Nursery / Schnittke: In Memoriam (Live) (2017)

Irina Muratova, Gennady Rozhdestvensky & Moscow Philharmonic Orchestra - Mussorgsky: The Nursery / Schnittke: In Memoriam (Live) (2017)
WEB FLAC (tracks) - 157 Mb | MP3 CBR 320 kbps - 92 Mb | 00:40:02
Classical | Label: Melodiya

The Nursery (Russian: Детская, Detskaya, literally Children's [Room]) is a song cycle by Modest Mussorgsky set to his own lyrics, composed between 1868 and 1872. The cycle was published in two series. Only the first two songs survive of the second series. During the late ’60s and early ’70s, Schnittke’s experiments with form and compositional style produced several important works: the Violin Sonata “Quasi una sonata” (1968), the First Symphony (1969-72), the Suite in the Olden Style (1972), and the Requiem (1975). It was during this period that Schnittke composed In memoriam…, which he adapted from his Piano Quintet (1972-76).

Van Cliburn - Tchaikovsky: Piano Concerto No. 1; Rachmaninov: Piano Concerto No. 3; Kabalevsky: Rondo (2008)

Posted By: Designol
Van Cliburn - Tchaikovsky: Piano Concerto No. 1; Rachmaninov: Piano Concerto No. 3; Kabalevsky: Rondo (2008)

Tchaikovsky: Piano Concerto No. 1; Rachmaninov: Piano Concerto No. 3; Kabalevsky: Rondo (2008)
Final of the 1958 Tchaikovsky Competition (Previously unpublished)
Van Cliburn, piano; Moscow Philharmonic Orchestra; Kyrill Kondrashin, conductor

EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue&Log) ~ 341 Mb | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 202 Mb | Scans included
Genre: Classical | Label: Testament | # SBT1440 | Time: 01:19:54

Deep in the heart of the Cold War, there was once a miracle in Moscow – Texas-based classical pianist Van Cliburn, of whom no one had heard, conquered at the First Tchaikovsky Competition, an event set aside to showcase Soviet talent. Cliburn was warned by his own government not to go, given the tense political relationship between the United States and Soviet Union at the time, and once he arrived he was greeted as a party crasher, subject to hostile stares and animosity of the kind he had never dreamed of back in Texas. And it was Cliburn, at the end, which brought down the house, and held the award. Back in America, he was greeted with a ticker tape parade and was the subject of a best-selling biography by Abram Chasins, The Van Cliburn Story, copies of which continue to clog the shelves of American thrift stores five decades hence. Ultimately, though, Cliburn's celebrity lost its luster. Nerves, ultra-picky perfectionism, and mishandling by management led to his early retirement from the concert scene; his greatest latter-day achievement being the force behind the Van Cliburn Piano Competition, America's most prestigious such event.