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The Hilliard Ensemble, Dresdner Philharmonie, Dennis Russell Davies - Schnittke: Symphony No.9; Raskatov: Nunc dimittis (2009)

Posted By: Designol
The Hilliard Ensemble, Dresdner Philharmonie, Dennis Russell Davies - Schnittke: Symphony No.9; Raskatov: Nunc dimittis (2009)

Alfred Schnittke: Symphony No. 9; Alexander Raskatov: Nunc dimittis (2009)
Elena Vassilieva, mezzo-soprano, The Hilliard Ensemble
Dresdner Philharmonie, conducted by Dennis Russell Davies

EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue&Log) ~ 214 Mb | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 146 Mb | Scans included
Classical | Label: ECM | # ECM New Series 2025, 476 6994 | Time: 00:53:05

This 2009 ECM disc containing the world premiere of Alfred Schnittke's Ninth Symphony, the composer's final work, will be mandatory listening for fans of post-modernist Russian music, or contemporary music in general. Begun after the premiere of Schnittke's Eighth Symphony in 1994 and unfinished at the composer's death in 1998, the Ninth existed only as three movements of manuscript (and indecipherable manuscript at that: a stroke had paralyzed Schnittke's right side, forcing him to write with his left hand) until composer Alexandr Raskatov deciphered the manuscript and conductor Dennis Russell Davies presented its premiere. As presented in this January 2008 recording, Schnittke's Ninth continues and extends the austere sound world of the Eighth into ever more severe zones. There's no denying this is the authentic voice of Schnittke: the etiolated textures, abrupt gestures, timeless tempos, and haunting themes have clear roots in the composer's preceding works. Davies and the excellent Dresdner Philharmonie appear acutely conscious that the Ninth was the composer's last work, but the tone of leave-taking is inherent in Schnittke's inward music.

Marcin Markowicz, Grzegorz Skrobinski - Different Things: Erich Korngold, Nino Rota, Alfred Schnittke, Philip Glass (2017)

Posted By: Designol
Marcin Markowicz, Grzegorz Skrobinski - Different Things: Erich Korngold, Nino Rota, Alfred Schnittke, Philip Glass (2017)

Different Things: Erich Wolfgang Korngold, Nino Rota, Alfred Schnittke, Philip Glass (2017)
Marcin Markowicz (violin), Grzegorz Skrobiński (piano)

EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue&Log) ~ 333 Mb | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 199 Mb | Scans included
Genre: Classical | Label: CD Accord / NFM | # ACD 235 / NFM 38 | 01:10:38

Korngold, Rota, Schnittke, Glass – four different artistic personalities. Each of these composers was active in totally different conditions; and therefore their life circumstances and consequently their artistic choices are incomparable. What may connect Korngold and Nino Rota are their early debuts as composers – both were prodigies. Seeking analogies in the lives of Alfred Schnittke and Philip Glass would come to naught. There is, however, another common denominator for their work – all of them were hugely successful in writing film music. Korngold codified its modern canons ruling to this day. Without Nino Rota it would be difficult to imagine Federico Fellini’s masterpieces. Alfred Schnittke found in the realm of cinema a domain of relative artistic freedom; Philip Glass a platform for his ambitiously non-clichéd art, opposing the musical mainstream of the last decades of the 20th century and the first decades of the 21st century.

Kim Kashkashian, Dennis Russell Davies - Kancheli: Vom Winde Beweint; Schnittke: Konzert Fur Viola Und Orchester (1992) [Re-Up]

Posted By: Designol
Kim Kashkashian, Dennis Russell Davies - Kancheli: Vom Winde Beweint; Schnittke: Konzert Fur Viola Und Orchester (1992) [Re-Up]

Giya Kancheli: Vom Winde Beweint; Alfred Schnittke: Konzert Für Viola Und Orchester (1992)
Orchester der Beethovenhalle Bonn; Rundfunk-Sinfonieorchester Saarbrücken
Kim Kashkashian, viola; Dennis Russell Davies, conductor

EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue&Log) ~ 298 Mb | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 200 Mb | Scans included
Classical, Contemporary | Label: ECM | # ECM New Series 1471, 437 199-2 | 01:07:28

This powerful record brings together two of the most seminal works for viola and orchestra of the twentieth century. Although these pieces are as different as they are similar, together they form a distinct balance of sentiment and execution.

Kaspars Putniņš, Estonian Philharmonic Chamber Choir - Schnittke: Psalms of Repentance; Pärt: Magnificat & Nunc Dimitti (2017)

Posted By: ArlegZ
Kaspars Putniņš, Estonian Philharmonic Chamber Choir - Schnittke: Psalms of Repentance; Pärt: Magnificat & Nunc Dimitti (2017)

Kaspars Putniņš, Estonian Philharmonic Chamber Choir - Schnittke: Psalms of Repentance; Pärt: Magnificat & Nunc Dimitti (2017)
EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue & Log) ~ 242 Mb | Total time: 59:51 | Scans included
Classical | Label: BIS | BIS-2292 SACD | Recorded: 2017

Alfred Schnittke and Arvo Pärt lived through times of remarkable change in the last decades of the Soviet Union. From the 1970s, state restrictions on religion were gradually relaxed and this was reflected in the arts and especially in music. Schnittke’s adoption of Christianity was triggered by the death of his mother in 1972, and culminated in his later conversion to Catholicism. Pärt was from a nominally Lutheran background in Estonia, but embraced the Orthodox faith in the 1970s, following intensive study of liturgical music. Both composers began to incorporate religious themes into their work, moving away from the modernist abstraction that had characterized their early careers.

Keller Quartett, Alexei Lubimov - Alfred Schnittke, Dmitri Shostakovich: Lento (2003)

Posted By: Designol
Keller Quartett, Alexei Lubimov - Alfred Schnittke, Dmitri Shostakovich: Lento (2003)

Keller Quartett, Alexei Lubimov - Alfred Schnittke, Dmitri Shostakovich: Lento (2003)
EAC | FLAC | Tracks (Cue&Log) ~ 237 Mb | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 154 Mb | Scans included
Genre: Classical | Label: ECM | # ECM New Series 1755, 461 815-2 | Time: 01:05:00

Schnittke's Piano Quintet, a creative response to his mother's death, is an austere, haunting work full of grief and tenderness that marks one of his early ventures into polystylistic writing. The opening piano solo is unique, a spare statement of puzzlement in the face of tragedy. It gives way to a waltz, as if recapturing a lost past, then the graceful dance melody literally disintegrates as the strings venture off into other regions, vainly trying to reassemble the theme and failing. At the end of its touching five movements the music's despair is transformed into serene, hard-won acceptance. Shostakovitch's 15th Quartet, his final statement in that form, premiered just months before his death. It's six slow movements are shot through with contemplative sadness and regret. The music is so rich in texture and substance that attention never flags.