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Masaaki Suzuki, Bach Collegium Japan, Concerto Palatino - Johann Rudolf Ahle: "Neu-gepflanzte Thüringische Lust-Garten" (1997)

Posted By: ArlegZ
Masaaki Suzuki, Bach Collegium Japan, Concerto Palatino - Johann Rudolf Ahle: "Neu-gepflanzte Thüringische Lust-Garten" (1997)

Masaaki Suzuki, Bach Collegium Japan, Concerto Palatino - Johann Rudolf Ahle: "Neu-gepflanzte Thüringische Lust-Garten" (1997)
EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue & Log) ~ 235 Mb | Total time: 56:10 | Scans included
Classical | BIS | BIS-CD-821 | Recorded: 1996

This truly international ensemble drawn from Japan, Germany and the USA discloses a Newly Planted Thuringian Pleasure Garden virtually unknown on disc. Johann Rudolf Able (1625-73) worked at St Blasius Church in Muhlhausen (a predecessor there of JS Bach), but his stylistic lineage is clearly from Venice and Gabrieli, via Schiitz. Into his ‘garden’ Ahle ‘transplanted… new spiritual musical plants with three to ten and more parts’. The selection here uses four lucid voices, a cornetto and four trombones, a pair of violins and continue organ.

Hidemi Suzuki, Bach Collegium Japan - C.P.E. Bach: The Three Cello Concertos (1997)

Posted By: ArlegZ
Hidemi Suzuki, Bach Collegium Japan - C.P.E. Bach: The Three Cello Concertos (1997)

Hidemi Suzuki, Bach Collegium Japan - C.P.E. Bach: The Three Cello Concertos (1997)
EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue & Log) ~ 317 Mb | Total time: 67:33 | Scans included
Classical | Label: BIS Records | # BIS-CD-807 | Recorded: 1996

Why is it that cellists who bemoan their lack of concerto repertory continue to neglect CPE Bach's three essays in the genre? It's a mystery; they're excellent pieces, full of infectious nervous energy in their outer movements and tender lyricism in central ones. They aren't unknown to the recording catalogues, however, not least because they also exist in alternative versions which the composer made for flute and harpsichord.

Bach Collegium Japan, Masaaki Suzuki - Johann Sebastian Bach: Lutheran Masses, Vol. 1 (2015) [Re-Up]

Posted By: Designol
Bach Collegium Japan, Masaaki Suzuki - Johann Sebastian Bach: Lutheran Masses, Vol. 1 (2015) [Re-Up]

Bach Collegium Japan, Masaaki Suzuki - Johann Sebastian Bach: Lutheran Masses, Vol. 1 (2015)
EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue&Log) ~ 319 Mb | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 150 Mb | Scans ~ 41 Mb
Genre: Classical, Choral | Label: BIS | # BIS-2081 | Time: 01:05:30

The Reformations fundamental alterations to traditional forms of church service, had, by Bach's time, resulted in German churches Latin yielding to the country's own language. To a limited extent, however, the Latin mass text did remain in use in the Protestant church in particular the Kyrie and Gloria sections. Termed Missa to differentiate them from complete settings, these pieces are often referred to now as 'Lutheran Masses'. Bach's famous Mass in B minor began its existence as a work of this type, and four other examples from Bach's pen have survived. Newly performed and recorded by Bach Collegium Japan under the direction of Masaaki Suzuki, the Missae BWV 235 and 236 are here combined with four separate settings of the Sanctus. Two of these are original works, whereas BWV 241, and possibly also 240, is an arrangement of another composers setting. The 'KyrieChriste' BWV Anh 26 is an example of how Bach used music by other composers, in this case by his Neapolitan contemporary Francesco Durante.

Masaaki Suzuki, Bach Collegium Japan - Kuhnau, Zelenka, J.S. Bach: Magnificat (1999)

Posted By: ArlegZ
Masaaki Suzuki, Bach Collegium Japan - Kuhnau, Zelenka, J.S. Bach: Magnificat (1999)

Masaaki Suzuki, Bach Collegium Japan - Kuhnau, Zelenka, J.S. Bach: Magnificat (1999)
EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue & Log) ~ 333 Mb | Total time: 71:31 | Scans included
Classical | Label: BIS | # BIS-CD-1011 | Recorded: 1998

Bach's setting of the Magnificat is one of his most often-recorded vocal works; as a rule, it's paired with one of Bach's lavishly scored festal cantatas. (The Easter Oratorio seems to be a current favorite.) Masaaki Suzuki and the Bach Collegium Japan had a different idea: they've paired Bach's Magnificat with roughly contemporary settings by Johann Kuhnau, who was Bach's immediate predecessor in Leipzig, and Jan Dismas Zelenka, who was a composer at the court of Saxony in Dresden. Zelenka is an interesting composer, among the most underrated of the Baroque era. His writing is less dense and intricate than Bach's–at times it looks forward to the simpler, more elegant style of Haydn and C.P.E. Bach. Zelenka knew his counterpoint, however, and was fond of slipping the occasional surprising chord change into his music.

Bach Collegium Japan, Masaaki Suzuki - Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: Requiem & Vesperae solennes de confessore (2014) [Re-Up]

Posted By: Designol
Bach Collegium Japan, Masaaki Suzuki - Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: Requiem & Vesperae solennes de confessore (2014) [Re-Up]

Bach Collegium Japan, Masaaki Suzuki - Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: Requiem (2014)
EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue&Log) ~ 345 Mb | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 171 Mb | Scans ~ 73 Mb
Genre: Classical, Choral | Label: BIS Records | # BIS-2091 SACD | Time: 01:14:35

Mozart's Requiem is one of the truly iconic works in the history of music. A prime reason for this is of course its musical qualities; but even before that, legends had begun to form around the work - that it was written to fulfill an anonymous commission received through 'an unknown, grey stranger' - is the stuff of mystery novels, while the fact that Mozart fell ill and died while composing it has been exploited to great melodramatic effect. One thing that we know for certain is that its first performance took place at a memorial service for Mozart only days after his death. The performers used the composer's incomplete autograph, but very soon attempts to complete the work were set in motion by Mozart's widow. In 1800 the Requiem, in Franz Xaver Süssmayr's completion, appeared in print; it is this version that is still by far the most widely performed. Many have tried to improve on it, however, or make their own versions based on the autograph. For this recording, Masaaki Suzuki and the Bach Collegium Japan commissioned a new performing edition.

Masato Suzuki, Bach Collegium Japan - Johann Sebastian Bach: Concertos for Harpsichord, Vol. 1 (2020)

Posted By: ArlegZ
Masato Suzuki, Bach Collegium Japan - Johann Sebastian Bach: Concertos for Harpsichord, Vol. 1 (2020)

Masato Suzuki, Bach Collegium Japan - Johann Sebastian Bach: Concertos for Harpsichord, Vol. 1 (2020)
EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue & Log) ~ 414 Mb | Total time: 66:34 | Scans included
Classical | Label: BIS Records | # BIS-2401 SACD | Recorded: 2018

The extant concertos by Johann Sebastian Bach for one harpsichord and strings were all composed before 1738, which makes them some of the first, if not the first keyboard concertos – a genre destined to become one of the most popular within classical music. In all likelihood Bach wrote them for his own use (or that of his talented sons) – probably to be performed with Leipzig’s Collegium Musicum of which he had taken over as director in 1729. The fresh and exuberant character one finds in the concertos seems to reflect how much Bach enjoyed the opportunity to engage with his fellow musicians.

Bach Collegium Japan, Soloists, Masaaki Suzuki - W.A. Mozart: Great Mass in C minor; Exsultate, jubilate (2016) [Re-Up]

Posted By: Designol
Bach Collegium Japan, Soloists, Masaaki Suzuki - W.A. Mozart: Great Mass in C minor; Exsultate, jubilate (2016) [Re-Up]

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: Great Mass in C minor; Exsultate, jubilate (2016)
Christian Immler, Makoto Sakurada, Carolyn Sampson, Olivia Vermeulen
Bach Collegium Japan; Masaaki Suzuki, conductor

EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue&Log) ~ 382 Mb | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 179 Mb | Scans included
Genre: Classical, Choral, Vocal | Label: BIS | # BIS-SACD-2171 | Time: 01:11:17

As the mysterious opening bars of the Kyrie gradually emerge into the light, we know that this recording of Mozart’s glorious Great Mass in C minor is a special one: the tempi perfect, the unfolding drama of the choral writing so carefully judged, and, above it all, the crystalline beauty of soloist Carolyn Sampson’s soprano, floating like a ministering angel. Masaaki Suzuki’s meticulous attention to detail, so rewarding in his remarkable Bach recordings, shines throughout this disc, the playing alert, the choir responsive, the soloists thrilling. And there is the bonus of an exhilarating Exsultate, Jubilate with Sampson on top form.

Masaaki Suzuki, Bach Collegium Japan - Johann Sebastian Bach: Matthäus-Passion (2019)

Posted By: ArlegZ
Masaaki Suzuki, Bach Collegium Japan - Johann Sebastian Bach: Matthäus-Passion (2019)

Masaaki Suzuki, Bach Collegium Japan - Johann Sebastian Bach: Matthäus-Passion (2019)
EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue & Log) ~ 754 Mb | Total time: 163:14 | Scans included
Classical | Label: BIS | BIS-SACD-2500 | Recorded: 2019

Masaaki Suzuki and his Bach Collegium Japan made their first recording of the St Matthew Passion in March 1999. Twenty years later, in April 2019, it was time once again, as the singers and players gathered in the Concert Hall of the Saitama Arts Theater in Japan. ‘A profound joy’ is how Masaaki Suzuki describes his emotion at the opportunity to record Bach’s great fresco of Christ’s Passion for a second time. And this time, he and his ensemble have brought with them into the concert hall a profound and collective familiarity with Bach’s choral music, after having recorded more or less all of it in the meantime, including the complete sacred cantatas.

Bach Collegium Japan & Masaaki Suzuki - J.S. Bach: St. John Passion, BWV 245 (2020)

Posted By: delpotro
Bach Collegium Japan & Masaaki Suzuki - J.S. Bach: St. John Passion, BWV 245 (2020)

Bach Collegium Japan & Masaaki Suzuki - J.S. Bach: St. John Passion, BWV 245 (2020)
WEB FLAC (tracks) - 504 Mb | MP3 CBR 320 kbps - 253 Mb | Digital booklet | 01:44:53
Classical, Sacred, Vocal | Label: BIS

Suzuki presents the 1749 version of the St. John Passion, a work that underwent many changes since its first performance in 1724. This fourth version, performed at the end of Bach's life, represents his ultimate vision of this great work. (Suzuki includes in an appendix three arias from the 1725 version that Bach removed from this later version.)