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Norwegian Chamber Orchestra, Danish National Symphony Orchestra & Per Kristian Skalstad, Thomas Søndergård - Bent Sørensen: Co

Posted By: varrock
Norwegian Chamber Orchestra, Danish National Symphony Orchestra & Per Kristian Skalstad, Thomas Søndergård - Bent Sørensen: Co

Norwegian Chamber Orchestra, Danish National Symphony Orchestra & Per Kristian Skalstad, Thomas Søndergård - Bent Sørensen: Concertos (2020)
WEB FLAC (tracks+booklet) - 270 MB | Tracks: 11 | 56:59 min
Style: Classical | Label: Dacapo

Bent Sørensens (b. 1958) distinctive music thrives on the intangible, from atmospheres and feelings to memories and dreams. This recording assembles three recent concertos from the GrawemeyerAward-winning composer performed by distinguished Nordic soloists, beginning with a second piano concerto played by its dedicatee and inspiration, Leif Ove Andsnes. Sørensensclarinet concerto for Martin Fröstis inspired by the scents of Spanish poetry, while his trumpet concerto for Tine Thing Helsethfeeds of his constant obsession with the beauty and vulnerability of Venice. Each is highly evocative and filled with Sørensens own etched beauty.

Christian Tetzlaff, Danish National SO, Thomas Dausgaard - Jean Sibelius: The Complete Works For Violin and Orchestra (2002)

Posted By: Designol
Christian Tetzlaff, Danish National SO, Thomas Dausgaard - Jean Sibelius: The Complete Works For Violin and Orchestra (2002)

Jean Sibelius: The Complete Works For Violin and Orchestra (2002)
Christian Tetzlaff, violin; Danish National Symphony Orchestra; Thomas Dausgaard, conductor

EAC | FLAC | Tracks (Cue&Log) ~ 363 Mb | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 217 Mb | Scans included
Genre: Classical | Label: Virgin | # 7243 5 45534 2 4 | Time: 01:18:45

Christian Tetzlaff’s effortless virtuosity, purity of intonation, and slight emotional reticence perfectly suits Sibelius, making this the finest available collection of the Finnish composer’s music for violin and orchestra. In the concerto, Tetzlaff’s relative coolness makes the music sound more like Sibelius and less like a violin concerto, which is all to the good. That doesn’t mean he lacks anything in sheer technique: indeed, his first-movement cadenza impresses as one of the most impressively concentrated and musically satisfying on disc. Tetzlaff’s slow movement sings but avoids panting and heaving, while the finale realizes the music’s gentle melancholy as well as its more thrusting elements. He’s nicely accompanied by Thomas Dausgaard, whose gentle support perfectly suits the overall interpretation.