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Perez Prado - Best Selection (2009) Japanese SHM-CD

Posted By: Designol
Perez Prado - Best Selection (2009) Japanese SHM-CD

Pérez Prado - Best Selection (2009) Japanese SHM-CD
EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue&Log) ~ 490 Mb | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 217 Mb | Scans included
Mambo, Salsa, Latin Big Band, Latin Jazz | Label: UMC | # UICY-80035 | 01:12:01

Universally known as the King of the Mambo, Pérez Prado was the single most important musician involved in the hugely popular Latin dance craze. Whether he actually created the rhythm is somewhat disputed, but it's abundantly clear that Prado developed it into a bright, swinging style with massive appeal for dancers of all backgrounds and classes. Prado's mambo was filled with piercing high-register trumpets, undulating saxophone counterpoint, atmospheric organ (later on), and harmonic ideas borrowed from jazz. While his tight percussion arrangements allowed for little improvisation, they were dense and sharply focused, keeping the underlying syncopations easy for dancers to follow. Prado played the piano, but was often more in his element as the focal point of the audience's excitement; he leaped, kicked, danced, shouted, grunted, and exhorted his musicians with a dynamic stage presence that put many more sedate conductors and bandleaders to shame. With this blueprint, Prado brought mambo all the way into the pop mainstream, inspiring countless imitators and scoring two number one singles on the pop charts (albeit in a smoother vein than the fare that first made his name) as the fad snowballed. He was a star throughout most of the Western Hemisphere during the '50s, and even after his popularity waned in the United States, he remained a widely respected figure in many Latin countries, especially his adopted home of Mexico.

Perez Prado and His Orchestra - "Prez" (1958) [Reissue 1995] (Repost)

Posted By: gribovar
Perez Prado and His Orchestra - "Prez" (1958) [Reissue 1995] (Repost)

Perez Prado - Prez (1958) [Reissue 1995]
EAC Rip | FLAC (image+.cue+log) - 282 MB | MP3 CBR 320 kbps (LAME 3.93) - 106 MB | Covers - 35 MB
Genre: Latin Jazz, Mambo, Big Band | RAR 3% Rec. | Label: BMG Music (74321 26052 2)

Prez was the album that brought Perez Prado, the King of the Mambo, into the American mainstream. Here he rearranged pop hits to fit the Latin dance idiom, adding a few genuine mambos for good measure. Though the album wasn't pure mambo, it was simply delightful music and it illustrated how to bring world music to a broader, popular audience.

Johnny Pacheco - Mi Musica Es Para Ti (2002)

Posted By: tiburon
Johnny Pacheco - Mi Musica Es Para Ti (2002)

Johnny Pacheco - Mi Musica Es Para Ti (2002)
EAC 1.1 | FLAC tracks level 8 | Cue+Log+M3U | Full Scans 300dpi | 244MB + 5% Recovery
MP3 CBR 320 Kbps | 79MB + 5% Recovery
Genre: Latin Jazz, Cha-Cha, Mambo

This is a repackaging of a release from 1960 credited to both the René Hernandez Orchestra and the René Hernandez Orchestra with Pacheco, called Percussive Latino Cha Cha Cha (Audio Fidelity label). According to Discogs information this session was recorded in November, 1957, in New York City.

VA - Original De Cuba: 5 Leyendas (2005) 5CD Box Set

Posted By: Designol
VA - Original De Cuba: 5 Leyendas (2005) 5CD Box Set

VA - Original De Cuba: 5 Leyendas (2005) 5CD Box Set
Compay Segundo - Eliades Ochoa - Ibrahim Ferrer - Omara Portuondo - Rubén González

EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue&Log) ~ 1.49 Gb | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 641 Mb | Scans ~ 40 Mb | Time: 04:29:28
Cuban Traditions, Latin Folk, Son, Mambo, Afro-Cuban Jazz | Label: Egrem | # COL-0010

Omara Portuondo, Eliades Ochoa, Francisco Repilado (Compay Segundo), Ibrahin Ferrer y Rubén González, all legendary figures of the Cuban music scene, shine in the recording world for their invaluable contribution to the success reached by Buenavista Social Club. This collection offers us five compilations on 5 CD’s, each dedicated to these five legends. They include selected themes of anthologies previously published from these great artists. It also includes a booklet with wide comments of noted musicologists deepening the history of each one of these figures and their significance in the Cuban musical context.

VA - Afro Cuban Jazz: 1947-1960 (1995)

Posted By: Designol
VA - Afro Cuban Jazz: 1947-1960 (1995)

VA - Afro Cuban Jazz: 1947-1960 (1995)
EAC | FLAC | Tracks (Cue&Log) ~ 369 Mb | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 170 Mb | Scans included
Label: Giants Of Jazz | # CD 53170 | Time: 01:06:38
Afro Cuban Jazz, Big Band, Bop, Mambo

Featuring prime Latin jazz cuts from the heyday of the mambo, Afro Cuban Jazz: 1947-1960 is really a better than average showcase for one of the music's best: Machito. In fact, this disc contains 13 sides by Machito & His Orchestra, including two bebop gems featuring Charlie Parker ("Mango Mangue," "No Noise, Pts. 1-2"). That's not to overlook the presence of one of the supreme champions of Latin jazz, Dizzy Gillespie ("Manteca"), Stan Kenton and his mathematically frenetic bongo jams, and J.J. Johnson and Kai Winding teaming up for a couple of classics. Truthfully, however, the real meat here is heard on such Machito dancefloor fillers as "Oyeme" and "Minor Rama." So, when you've got a jones for jazz in a mambo mood, this disc will provide the needed salve.

Celia Cruz - Exitos Eternos (2003)

Posted By: Designol
Celia Cruz - Exitos Eternos (2003)

Celia Cruz - Éxitos Eternos (2003)
EAC | FLAC | Tracks (Cue&Log) ~ 478 Mb | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 175 Mb | Scans included
Label: Universal | # 0044006740423 | Time: 01:08:18
Salsa, Mambo, Latin Dance-Pop, Latin Jazz

With her powerful pipes, stunning showmanship, and superhuman sense of timing, Celia Cruz defined her chosen genre like few other performers in the history of popular music. EXITOS ETERNOS is a collection of tracks the "Queen of Salsa" recorded during the last decade of her life that, despite the vocalist's advanced age, clearly show Cruz's talents never wavered. Known for her uncompromising attitude and refusal to sing in English, Cruz valued aesthetic purity, but never became a museum piece. A driving pulse and rhythmic toasting that recall dancehall reggae propel her 2001 hit "La Negra Tiene Tumbao," and other tracks feature subtle synthesizer textures. Unlike lesser artists, however, Cruz is able to incorporate these disparate sonic colors seamlessly, making them sound as traditional as a conga drum or guiro. Of course, the unrelenting force behind each recording is Cruz's astounding voice, the sheer energy of which makes even these later recordings sound both classic and utterly contemporary.

Ry Cooder & Manuel Galban - Mambo Sinuendo (2003) {Nonesuch}

Posted By: tiburon
Ry Cooder & Manuel Galban - Mambo Sinuendo (2003) {Nonesuch}

Ry Cooder & Manuel Galban - Mambo Sinuendo (2003) {Nonesuch}
EAC 0.95b4 | FLAC Image level 8 | Cue+Log | Full Scans 300dpi | 336MB + 5% Recovery
MP3 CBR 320 Kbps | 115MB + 5% Recovery
Genre: Afro-Cuban Jazz, Mambo, Ethnic Fusion

Mambo Sinuendo is a collaboration between Ry Cooder and Buena Vista alum (and formerly of many other groups as well) Manuel Galban. The album attempts to catch an old style popularized in Cuba by Galban, and was, surprisingly, never followed up on by anybody after Galban. It's a guitar-based romp closely based in the pop/jazz crossovers of the 1950s-1960s (Henry Mancini, Nelson Riddle, etc). There's a touch of exoticism here and there, and a larger touch of a relatively Hawaiian feel throughout the whole via the guitar techniques employed by the pair. It's all somewhere in a form between lounge, mambo, and Esquivel's old space-age-bachelor-pad music. In rare instances, there's even a little bit of a house drum loop added in by the percussionists.

Perez Prado - King Of Mambo (1992) {Sarabandas}

Posted By: tiburon
Perez Prado - King Of Mambo (1992) {Sarabandas}

Perez Prado - King Of Mambo (1992) {Sarabandas}
EAC 0.99pb5 | FLAC tracks level 5 | Cue+Log+M3U | Scans 400dpi | 361MB + 5% Recovery
MP3 CBR 320 Kbps | 142MB + 5% Recovery
Genre: Latin Jazz, Mambo

Universally known as the King of the Mambo, Pérez Prado was the single most important musician involved in the hugely popular Latin dance craze. Whether he actually created the rhythm is somewhat disputed, but it's abundantly clear that Prado developed it into a bright, swinging style with massive appeal for dancers of all backgrounds and classes.
Prado's mambo was filled with piercing high-register trumpets, undulating saxophone counterpoint, atmospheric organ (later on), and harmonic ideas borrowed from jazz. While his tight percussion arrangements allowed for little improvisation, they were dense and sharply focused, keeping the underlying syncopations easy for dancers to follow.