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Katona Twins, Juanita Lascaro, David Garcia Mir - Manuel de Falla (2009)

Posted By: ArlegZ
Katona Twins, Juanita Lascaro, David Garcia Mir - Manuel de Falla (2009)

Katona Twins, Juanita Lascaro, David Garcia Mir - Manuel de Falla (2009)
EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue & Log) ~ 236 Mb | Total time: 57:00 | Scans included
Classical | Label: Channel Classics ‎| CCSSA 28809 | Recorded: 2008

Works of Manuel de Falla - widely regarded as the most distinguished Spanish composer of the early twentieth century - are strongly influenced by Spanish folk music in which the guitar is central. Although he composed only one piece for that instrument his inspiration was flamenco and early Spanish music, including the guitar works of Gaspar Sanz. The guitar also features in Falla‘s first great success, the opera ‘La Vida Breve’. For this recording, we have selected and transcribed works in which the influence of the guitar was dominant thus translating these pieces back to their original source of inspiration.

Miguel Baselga - Manuel de Falla: The Complete Solo Piano Music (1996)

Posted By: Designol
Miguel Baselga - Manuel de Falla: The Complete Solo Piano Music (1996)

Miguel Baselga - Manuel de Falla: The Complete Solo Piano Music (1996)
EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue&Log) ~ 206 Mb | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 182 Mb | Artwork included
Genre: Classical | Label: BIS | # BIS-CD-773 | Time: 01:17:30

Playing Falla in date order makes an odd-shaped recital: the tail is at the front. But it gives a graphic portrait of an explorer. The Spanish presence steadily insinuates itself until it grows fiercely concentrated, finally almost aphoristic. Baselga, an individual pianist in this very personal music, plays the Piezas españolas intensely, with plenty of staccato and a free pulse, scorning easy charm to find strength. In the stupendous Fantasía bética he lets the rhythms take hold gradually and locates the full gypsy-like restlessness of the ultra-ornamented melody at the centre. His ear for balance and virtuoso control of pace are compelling, but short of the ultimate physical exultation. Around these peaks he browses rewardingly, with more warmth and more pedal for the early pieces, relieving the often dry piano tone. It’s the mature and late works that awaken his interest most, and these include the quirkiest of them. Imagine the ‘Song of the Volga Boatmen’ in the style of Pictures at an Exhibition and you’re halfway there: an improbable political commission that Falla met at full power.